SBIR Phase 1 Solicitation  Abstract Archives

NASA 2011 STTR Phase 1 Solicitation


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T1.01-9899
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Synthetic Biology for Space Exploration
PROPOSAL TITLE: Biomining of regolith simulants for biological in situ resource utilization

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Universal Bio Mining, LLC
665 3rd Street, Suite 250
San Francisco, CA 94107-1953
(401) 523-8190

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
SETI Institute
189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100
Mountain View, CA 94043-5203
(408) 387-3270

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
John Cumbers
john.cumbers@universalbiomining.com
665 3rd Street, Suite 250
San Francisco,  CA 94107-1953
(401) 523-8190

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The goal of this proposed research is to advance the development of biological in situ resource utilization for NASA's space exploration programs. We plan to build a foundation to use synthetic biology to engineer microorganisms to extract metals from naturally occurring extraterrestrial regolith. We propose to create a novel growth medium designed to mimic the lunar regolith ice discovered at the south pole of the moon by the LCROSS mission. We will develop a bioleaching column for this simulant to purify metals for consumable production in space. We will characterize known biomining organisms to leach this simulant. Finally we will study the biochemical processes taking place in the leaching of the regolith to be able to improve the metabolism of these organisms in the future. In addition, will produce a database of organisms involved in biomining on Earth and the geologies and substrates that they have been found on. This database can be used as a tool to find undersampled mine sites that may contain novel organisms suitable for biomining in space. We then plan to develop a conceptual bioreactor which is designed to extract metals from regolith in space. We will perform a trade study of the mass, productivity, cost and energy requirements of such a bioreactor. Later phases of the research will involve characterization of the important enzymes involved in biomining in key organisms, adding to the limited existing knowledge of these pathways and leading to creation of a synthetic biological system for efficiently engineering them, which we will use to optimize these organisms for extracting relevant substrates in relevant space-settlement-like conditions. This further research will also include growth on Mars-like simulant regoliths, as well as improvement of the bioreactor model in a series of increasingly durable and realistic prototypes that will undergo both physical and functional testing.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Bioleaching organisms could potentially provide a relatively hands-off approach to mining extraterrestrial objects for valuable and rare metals, and biomining technology would be especially promising to resource-constrained space-based mining operations. Biomining tools could also be a useful resource for privatized space settlement projects, providing the same raw materials they could in a NASA-based facility. While biological organisms are used to a significant extent in some terrestrial mining operations, their cellular functions are still relatively poorly-understood both biochemically and genetically. As this proposed research will contribute to the understanding of certain organisms used in biomining, it will add to the current state of knowledge surrounding these organisms, and be especially useful in developing technologies for mining on terrestrial substrates similar to the extra-terrestrial regoliths studied.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
In-situ resource utilization using bioleaching methods to derive metals directly from the local regolith has the potential to provide an excellent source of raw materials for production processes in future settlement projects on the moon, Mars, or asteroids. As biomining organisms are self-replicating machines, they could be transported in small quantities and allowed to reproduce inside an extra-terrestrial bioreactor or other bioleaching site. The proposed investigation is relevant to NASA goals as follows: Several NASA programs are interested in ISRU options for reducing mission resource requirements by using available in situ resources. This project will also address NASA goals of preparing for human exploration of Mars by designing and implementing a human mission with acceptable cost, risk and performance. Although this phase 1 STTR starts on moon simulants, Mars simulants are proposed as part of the intended phase 2 of our project. Similarly to moon experiments, Martian studies could aid in producing a bioreactor that makes effective use of martian resources, increasing the level of self sufficiency of Mars operations, which will be even more critical as the distance to Mars is far greater than any previously-attempted manned space mission. In NASA's Strategic Plan, the strategic goal no. 1 is to "extend and sustain human activities across the solar system," and we believe that biological ISRU will be an essential component of this.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Biomass Growth
Remediation/Purification
In Situ Manufacturing
Processing Methods
Resource Extraction
Metallics


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T1.02-9940
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Commodity Based Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: An Electrochemical, Point-of-Care Detector for Reagent-free, In-situ Diagnostics of Pathogens

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
CFD Research Corporation
215 Wynn Drive, 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805-1926
(256) 726-4800

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Michigan Technilogical University
1400 Townsend Drive
Houghton, MI 49931-1295
(906) 487-1977

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Jianjun Wei
proposals-contracts@cfdrc.com
215 Wynn Drive, NW, Flr 5
Huntsville,  AL 35805-1926
(256) 327-0672

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
For long-term exploratory space travel, there will be a critical need for in-situ diagnosis and assessment of biological specimens from symptomatic astronauts, especially, disease pathogens (virus, bacterium, or fungus) and microbial contaminants. Hence, a real-time, non-culture-based microbial detection, identification and quantification system for on-flight monitoring and evaluation of pathogens from astronauts, or the space environment, is strongly desired. The success of such diagnostic tasks critically depends upon the degree of automation and reliability of such trace level detection. To meet this need, we propose to develop a novel miniaturized, point-of-care (POC) detector for reagent-free, no-culturing, in-situ diagnostics of disease pathogens. The envisioned device will be compact, lightweight, fully integrated and automated (requiring minimum human intervention), and highly cost-effective and power-efficient. In Phase I, we will develop a new type of electrochemical molecules and fabricate solid electrode-based probe for in-vitro demonstration of accurate and effective signal transduction of selective binding of pathogenic cells to the electrode as proof-of-principle. In Phase II, the electrode probe will be optimized to increase specificity, sensitivity, stability, and the response to regular biological samples. Finally, the sensor will be integrated with a compact handheld instrument for data collection, analysis and processing and interfacing with existing NASA space instrumentation for both terrestrial and microgravity environments evaluation.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The platform developed in this effort will provide the technological backbone to develop a new type of electrochemical sensor or diagnostic technology and no-cell-culturing-based pathogen detection for a variety of applications in healthcare, life sciences, hospital and health site monitoring. This platform will enable the creation of in-situ analytical tools for the preparation, detection, and analysis of low level pathogens obtained from biological fluid and/or water samples. It may find use in drug discovery and the study of human diseases, clinical and preclinical diagnosis, as well as in the areas of cellular biology, microbiology, and homeland security. Total market estimates exceed several hundred million dollars.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The end product of the proposed STTR effort will be a first-of-a-kind, commercially available, compact, low-cost, integrated disease pathogen analysis device without need of cell-culturing. NASA will have a handheld, easy-to-use electrochemical pathogen detector that can be easily integrated with existing astrobiological instrumentation and/or emerging smart biomedical system to keep track of astronaut health and space environment during planetary exploration. In addition, the same device can be adapted and used in other applications such as, life discovery on other planets, pharmacotherapy environment monitoring, and space biology experiments.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Health Monitoring & Sensing (see also Sensors)
Physiological/Psychological Countermeasures
Nanomaterials
Organics/Biomaterials/Hybrids
Smart/Multifunctional Materials
Biological (see also Biological Health/Life Support)
Biological Signature (i.e., Signs Of Life)
Chemical/Environmental (see also Biological Health/Life Support)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T1.03-9808
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Information Technologies for Intelligent Planetary Robotics
PROPOSAL TITLE: Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System (EAHMS)

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
American GNC Corporation
888 Easy Street
Simi Valley, CA 93065-1812
(805) 582-0582

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Pennsylvania State University
P.O. Box 30, Mail Stop 1250J
State College, PA 16804-0030
(814) 865-0307

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Tasso Politopoulos
tpolito@americangnc.com
888 Easy Street
Simi Valley,  CA 93065-1812
(805) 582-0582

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
For supporting NASA's Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems Roadmap, we are proposing the "Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System" (EAHMS) for planetary exploration, which will provide an integral flexible diagnostics and prognostics framework by advanced and novel methods for determining the operational condition in on-board sensors (odometry), actuators, and power systems. In EAHMS, high performance diagnostic techniques provide a foundation for tailoring robust and accurate failure detection and identification (FDI) in key components of a robotic vehicle's locomotion system (e.g. motors, encoders, etc.). This foundation is comprised of innovative and advanced features including: (a) an enhanced collaborative learning engine (eCLE); (b) sensor health diagnostics with slippage awareness based on an Extended Kalman filter sensor fusion process; and (c) an integral system design for optimized reliability. In particular, the eCLE provides a mechanism for facilitating autonomous operation, since it includes self-learning capability. The eCLE is developed within the context of health monitoring, but will also have the capability to be applied to different domains. Another innovation is the support for electronic circuits and boards considering radiation effects.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
One of the main objectives of this STTR is the commercialization of the project's research and the introduction of a commercialized product to the market place. The EAHMS will provide an integral solution for conducting diagnostics and prognostics in unmanned robotic vehicles. For example, US Army organizations within CECOM LCMC and Army Team C4ISR would benefit from the technologies. Specific application areas that would benefit from the technology include: (1) Robotic platforms and UGVs (e.g. TALON) for facility surveillance, disarming improvised explosive devices, etc; (2) Military vehicles for infantry combat (such as tanks), reconnaissance, command & control (e.g. LAV-C2), engineering (e.g. Buffalo MPRC), and armored fighting such as the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV); and (3) Non-ground vehicles such as maritime vessels, unmanned aerial vehicles, etc. (using aspects of the EAHMS).

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System will directly support NASA's future planetary exploration missions according to the RTA Roadmap. In particular, the pervasive use of intelligent robotics with self-monitoring diagnostic/prognostic capabilities will enhance exploration by increasing reliability and mission success potential. NASA robotic exploration missions involving Mars, small planetary bodies such as asteroids, and the moons of the Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn would all greatly benefit from the integration of an on-board health management system. An immediate application would be the NASA Ames Research Center's Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) which sets out to explore extreme environments, remote locations, and uncharted worlds based on new and novel technologies. Current NASA rovers such as the "K10" series operated by IRG would be prime candidates for integration of the software.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Intelligence
Perception/Vision
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
3D Imaging
Image Processing
Data Acquisition (see also Sensors)
Data Fusion
Data Input/Output Devices (Displays, Storage)
Data Processing
Knowledge Management
Inertial (see also Sensors)
Optical
Inertial
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Diagnostics/Prognostics


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T1.03-9922
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Information Technologies for Intelligent Planetary Robotics
PROPOSAL TITLE: Anytime Summarization for Remote Robot Operations

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
TRACLabs, Inc.
100 North East Loop 410, Suite 520
San Antonio, TX 78216-1234
(281) 461-7886

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Brigham Young University
A-285 ASB
Provo, UT 84602-1231
(801) 422-3360

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Debra Schreckenghost
schreck@traclabs.com
100 N.E. Loop 410, Suite 520
San Antonio,  TX 78216-1234
(281) 461-7886

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
NASA plans to use intelligent planetary rovers to improve the productivity and safety of human explorers. A key challenge in using robots to support human exploration is orienting remote personnel about robot operations as latency and communication constraints make real-time monitoring impractical. Communication bandwidth will be limited, making it essential to downlink important information early. Periods with no communication will require ground operations to catch up quickly when communication resumes. Consequently ground operators can no longer rely on eyes-on monitoring to orient them about robot performance and progress on mission objectives. Summary measures are needed to identify what progress the robot has made and, when progress is impeded, to indicate what went wrong. Trending measures also are needed that determine how well robotic assets are being utilized and identify opportunities to improve robot productivity. TRACLabs and Brigham Young University propose to develop software for anytime summarization that orients remote personnel quickly about rover operations performed without continuous, high bandwidth communication. An anytime summary will characterize progress on robot operations using whatever data has been downlinked when the summary request is made. It will compute performance measures that give an overview of robot mission success and the efficiency and effectiveness of robot operations, and will provide a launch point for interactive exploration of performance data. Because the quality of an anytime summary is affected by the latency in data availability for ground processing, we will investigate what summary information should be pre-computed by the robot, and the preferred order in which information should be downlinked. During Phase I we will design and prototype software for anytime summarization. We will evaluate this design for use in rover operations using NASA IRG robots. Phase I will produce a design for implementation in Phase II.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Department of Defense has increasingly relied on remotely operated robots and unmanned drones for hazardous missions, such as disarming improvised explosive devices or performing aerial surveillance. The software for anytime summarization supports remote situation awareness of such operations. In fact the measures of data quality and coverage were originally developed for video collected by UAV. In the private sector, remote monitoring of drilling operations has much in common with remote space operations. Drilling operations are hazardous, making remote operations desirable. Monitoring for key performance indicators is needed to ensure safety and to make operations more cost effective. The proposed anytime summarization aids situation awareness for remote monitoring of drilling operations.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Anytime summarization supports crew-centered operations by assisting astronauts in understanding robot performance without eyes-on supervision. These summaries also help remote controllers come up to speed quickly when they cannot observe operations directly due to communication constraints. The proposed project will develop and evaluate quantifiable metrics for robot performance that can be applied at different levels of robot autonomy (NASA Roadmap TA4). The technology for anytime summarization has direct application in NASA analogue field tests with intelligent rovers. One such test is rover exploration of a lava tube as a terrestrial analog for Mars subsurface exploration. Such subsurface operations will result in periods where the rover is out of communication. The proposed software will provide key performance indicators and interactive data exploration to quickly orient personnel once the rover is back in communication. The proposed metrics for data coverage and quality should help science teams find the best data collected by intelligent rovers, such as the Haughton Mars Project field tests. The strategies developed for providing the summaries when access to data is delayed should be applicable for field tests investigating time-delayed operations, such as Desert RATS.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Man-Machine Interaction
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T2.01-9801
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Aeronautics Experimental Capabilities
PROPOSAL TITLE: Energy Harvesting Wireless Strain Networks

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Prime Photonics, LC
1116 South Main Street Suite 200
Blacksburg, VA 24060-5548
(540) 961-2200

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Virginia Tech
304A Holden Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0002
(540) 231-0745

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
John Coggin
jcoggin@primephotonics.com
1116 South Main St. Ste 200
Blacksburg,  VA 24060-5548
(540) 961-2200

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Prime Research LC (PPLC) and Virginia Tech (VT) propose to develop an energy harvesting wireless strain node technology that utilizes single-crystal piezoelectric fiber-based energy harvesting, highly sensitive and low power piezoresistive strain gages, and ultra wide-band (UWB) ultra low power radio communication. Single crystal piezoelectric fibers promise to improve piezoelectric harvesting power density by a factor of 4 – 5  while the ultra wide-band radio (UWB) and piezoresistive strain gages promise to lower power requirements by almost 100x. The proposed Phase I work will demonstrate the technologies critical to successful commercialization of a low cost, mass producible, postage stamp sized wireless strain node. A key result of the Phase I effort will be demonstration of the proposed harvesting and sensing technologies. Demonstration of these two items will remove the most significant hurdles to a successful commercial product. Phase I will provide the data necessary to perform an integrated system design in the Phase I Option and during Phase II, PPLC and VT will fabricate the integrated device for use in field trials.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
PPLC will market the Energy Harvesting Wireless Strain Sensor (EHWSS) technology for use in support of US military mobile platforms (e.g. ships, aircraft), as well as commercial ships and other private sector industrial and structural monitoring applications such as infrastructure health monitoring (e.g. buildings and bridges) industrial equipment monitoring (e.g. mills and HVAC systems) and power generation equipment (e.g. wind turbines, steam turbines).

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The initial NASA commercial application of market the Energy Harvesting Wireless Strain Sensor (EHWSS) technology would be in support of advanced flight testing of low subsonic and high supersonic aircraft. The EHWSS system would facilitate monitoring of strain levels in key components of aircraft, particularly in areas that might prove problematic for traditional, wired sensing technologies. Refinement of power budgets and operation environments would allow for extension of EHWSS systems into NASA manned or unmanned space missions for spacecraft structural monitoring, including strain monitoring and/or damage event detection.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Aerodynamics
Avionics (see also Control and Monitoring)
Analytical Instruments (Solid, Liquid, Gas, Plasma, Energy; see also Sensors)
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Spacecraft Instrumentation & Astrionics (see also Communications; Control & Monitoring; Information Systems)
Space Transportation & Safety
Intelligence
Recovery (see also Vehicle Health Management)
Antennas
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Process Monitoring & Control
Materials (Insulator, Semiconductor, Substrate)
Generation
Characterization
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Ceramics
Composites
Smart/Multifunctional Materials
Acoustic/Vibration
Contact/Mechanical
Sensor Nodes & Webs (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport)
Diagnostics/Prognostics


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T2.01-9811
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Aeronautics Experimental Capabilities
PROPOSAL TITLE: Hybrid Propulsion for Upper-Stage Boosters

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Exquadrum, Inc.
12130 Rancho Road
Adelanto, CA 92301-2703
(760) 246-0279

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Alabama, Huntsville
5000 Technology Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899-0000
(256) 824-7200

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Kevin Mahaffy
kevin.mahaffy@exquadrum.com
12130 Rancho Road
Adelanto,  CA 92301-2703
(760) 246-0279

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The objective of the proposed research and development effort is to demonstrate the feasibility of an innovative approach to high-performance hybrid propulsion for upper-stages. The missions for these propulsion systems include launching small- and nano-satellites and conducting hypersonic flight test operations. The focus of the research effort will be on achieving high specific impulse by means of an innovative approach to nozzle design. The technology will be experimentally demonstrated in a series of hot-fire tests during the proposed research program.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Commercial and Military Small Launch Vehicle DoD Missile Defense Civilian Space Tourism

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Small and Nano-Satellite Launchers Hypersonic Flight Test for Propulsion and Materials Development Sub-Orbital Sounding Rockets

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Space Transportation & Safety
Characterization
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Prototyping
Fuels/Propellants
Launch Engine/Booster
Spacecraft Main Engine


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T2.01-9954
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Aeronautics Experimental Capabilities
PROPOSAL TITLE: Dynamic Stall Flow Control Through the Use of a Novel Plasma Based Actuator Technology

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Lynntech, Inc.
2501 Earl Rudder Freeway South
College Station, TX 77845-6023
(979) 764-2218

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
The University of Texas at Austin
210 East 24th Street, WRW
Austin, TX 78712-0235
(512) 471-7593

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Ashwin Balasubramanian
ashwin.balasubramanian@lynntech.com
2501 Earl Rudder Freeway South
College Station,  TX 77845-6023
(979) 764-2200

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Lynntech proposes a novel flow control methodology for airfoils undergoing dynamic stall. Dynamic stall refers to an aerodynamic phenomenon that is experienced by airfoils that undergo rapid changes in the flow angle of attack such as rotorcraft based airfoils, flapping wing technologies as well as fixed wing aircrafts undergoing sudden angle of attack changes. Dynamic stall is inherently an unsteady, non linear and complicated effect that can affect such flight parameters as lift, drag and airfoil stability. Lynntech, along with its STTR partner in Dr. Noel Clemens and Dr. Jayant Sirohi, at the University of Texas at Austin proposes to use novel pulsed plasma discharge based actuators for flow control on dynamically stalled airfoils. Lynntech has more than 20 years of experience with applied plasma physics and 10 years of experience with turbulent CFD modeling. Dr. Noel Clemens at the University of Texas Flow Imaging Research Laboratory in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, who has implemented and tested various types of plasma actuators for flow control. The proposed technology consists of pulsed plasma actuators which will induce high velocity airflow within the airfoil boundary layer, thus reattaching the flow. The proposed plasma actuator can achieve high Reynolds number (>5e6) flow control compared to contemporary dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators without relying on corona discharge / hot plasma technology. Advantages of the system include low power consumption, ease of installation, increased flight stability, reduced drag and higher stall angles.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Developing and dispersing this flow control technology will be of greatest benefit outside of NASA, with improved safety and profitability for commercial aircraft operators at all levels, from private pilots to commercial airlines. Beyond these direct flow control applications, development of the pulsed plasma jet systems have several other potential applications in the energy and emissions control industries. The significant energy associated with the ions, neutrals, metastables, and electrons in a dielectric barrier discharge can be utilized for heavy hydrocarbon cracking in oil refineries, producing alternative fuels from various feedstocks such as JP-8, renewable feedstocks such as biomass, and for producing energy from waste such as waste cooking oil, municipal solid waste etc. The pulsed plasma can also be used for regenerating NOx and CO2 emission control catalysts, by generating an oxygen discharge that can burn off the soot generated on the catalyst surface.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
One of NASA's functions is developing and demonstrating new flight technologies for both military and civilian use. The technology proposed here, if implemented, can reduce fuel consumption or increase payload. Either will make aircraft operation more profitable. Reducing fuel consumption will also reduce emissions, including aircraft produced CO2. Increasing boundary layer attachment will also make the aircraft more responsive to its controls, an added advantage.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Aerodynamics
Air Transportation & Safety
Avionics (see also Control and Monitoring)
Actuators & Motors


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T2.02-9821
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Aeroservoelastic (ASE) Control, Modeling, Simulation, and Optimization
PROPOSAL TITLE: Embedded Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Aeroelastic Wing Components

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Luna Innovations Incorporated
1 Riverside Circle, Suite 400
Roanoke, VA 24016-4962
(540) 769-8430

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Virginia Polytechnic and State University
1880 Pratt Drive, Suite 2006
Blacksburg, VA 24060-3580
(540) 231-9619

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Evan Lally
lallye@lunainnovations.com
3157 State Street
Blacksburg,  VA 24060-6604
(540) 558-1668

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
As the aerospace industry continues to push for greater vehicle efficiency, performance, and longevity, properties of wing aeroelasticity and flight dynamics have become increasingly important. Both the study and the active control of wing dynamics require advanced sensing technology to inform the design process on the ground and provide feedback for aeroservoelastic systems in the sky. Existing aeroelastic monitoring systems rely on large networks of individual strain sensors, which must be precisely mapped to the wing's surface, and from which dynamic wing shape can only be inferred from the synthesis of their strain measurements. To date, no technology has been demonstrated which can make a true measurement of distributed wing shape using a single embedded sensor. Luna Innovations, Inc. proposes to leverage its ongoing fiber optic shape sensing development effort to create a unique technology capable of measuring wing geometry and vibration in response to gusts, static or dynamic loading, and aeroservoelastic control. In partnership with Dr. Rakesh Kapania, Professor of Aerospace Engineering at Virginia Tech, Luna will design a model-based sensor layout, embed their miniature fiber optic shape sensing technology in an idealized flexible wing model, and demonstrate the feasibility of the technology in a wind tunnel environment.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Luna Innovations has proven track record of commercializing technology developed under the SBIR / STTR program, and has developed strong relationships with many of the DOD's prime contractors including Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, and Boeing. Cutting-edge unmanned aerial vehicles, such as Boeing's Phantom Eye High-Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) AUV, represent a rapidly increasing market for in-flight aeroelastic measurement and feedback technologies. Because of their large, lightweight wings and unpredictable high altitude operating environment, HALE AUVs have a pressing need for accurate, reliable wing shape measurement and control. Luna's embedded shape measurement system could provide vital information during design and testing, and in-flight operation to ensure optimal vehicle performance and help prevent excessive wing warp or vibration.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Successful development of the proposed embedded fiber optic wing shape sensing technology will support the mission directives of several of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) by adding key sensing capabilities for advanced on-the-ground and in-flight research as well as feedback information for aeroservoelastic systems. By enhancing static and dynamic wing performance, the use of distributed shape sensing systems in will enhance the performance and efficiency of next-generation commercial aircraft, such as those based on Boeing's Truss-Braced Wing technology

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Aerodynamics
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Fiber (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Photonics)
Lasers (Measuring/Sensing)
Acoustic/Vibration
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Diagnostics/Prognostics


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T2.02-9949
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Aeroservoelastic (ASE) Control, Modeling, Simulation, and Optimization
PROPOSAL TITLE: Vorticity State Estimation For Aeroelastic Control

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Tao of Systems Integration, Inc.
144 Research Drive
Hampton, VA 23666-1339
(757) 220-5040

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
California Institute of Technology
1200 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 201-15
Pasadena, CA 91125-0001
(626) 395-6357

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Arun Mangalam
arun@taosystems.us
144 Research Drive
Hampton,  VA 23666-1339
(757) 220-5040

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Flight control, structural reliability, and efficiency depend critically on the ability to assess the time-accurate unsteady aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting surface under nominal and adverse flow conditions. Tao Systems and California Institute of Technology propose to develop a flow control system that utilizes advanced sensors and a vorticity state estimator (VSE) to reach flow states unattainable without continuous control feedback. The flow control scheme enables manipulation of the vorticity state to achieve performance objectives, such as short take-off/landing through controlled aerodynamic lift at angles of attack near stall.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
For national security, the ability to cruise efficiently at a range of altitude, enabled by a substantial increase in cruise lift-to-drag (L/D) ratios over today's high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft, is vital, providing sustained presence and long range. Vorticity-based flow control would enable the efficient, robust active control of adaptive, lightweight wings to optimize lift distribution to maximize L/D. Cost-effectively improving the energy capture and reliability of wind turbines would help national renewable energy initiatives. A vorticity state estimator could provide output for control feedback to mitigate the turbine blade lifetime-limiting time varying loads generated by the ambient wind.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Vorticity-based flow control system will enable a number of revolutionary capabilities across a wide speed range, including, but not limited to: (1) shorter take-off and landing, (2) safe, reliable aircraft operation in turbulent condition, and (3) larger passenger and cargo capacity. The primary difficulty in all three revolutionary capabilities is the uncertainty in aerodynamic load & moments generated by the airstream in design and off-design conditions, e.g., turbulent flows, high angles of attack and unsteady flows. Measuring the unsteady aerodynamic loads/moments through the vorticity state reduces the aerodynamic uncertainty enabling the aircraft to timely, robustly compensate for the adverse, unsteady flow conditions. Therefore, the proposed innovation could be of significant interest to the aircraft civilian industry.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Aerodynamics
Air Transportation & Safety
Avionics (see also Control and Monitoring)
Navigation & Guidance
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Recovery (see also Vehicle Health Management)
Health Monitoring & Sensing (see also Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Attitude Determination & Control
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Characterization
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Inertial (see also Sensors)
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Diagnostics/Prognostics
Recovery (see also Autonomous Systems)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T3.01-9785
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion
PROPOSAL TITLE: Materials and Structures Optimization / Process Development for the Mega-ROSA / ROSA Solar Array

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Deployable Space Systems, Inc.
75 Robin Hill, Building B2
Goleta, CA 93117-3108
(805) 693-1319

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of California, Santa Barbara
Office of Research
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2050
(805) 893-4034

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Brian Spence
Brian.Spence@DeployableSpaceSystems.com
75 Robin Hill, Building B2
Goleta,  CA 93117-3108
(805) 722-8090

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS), in collaboration with the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Department of Mechanical Engineering, will focus the proposed NASA STTR Phase 1 program on the materials optimization, structures optimization, and manufacturing process optimization/development for the Mega-ROSA/ROSA solar array. The ROSA technology (termed for: Roll-Out Solar Array) is a new/innovative mission-enabling solar array system that offers maximum performance in all key metrics and unparalleled affordability for NASA's Space Science & Exploration missions. ROSA will enable NASA's emerging Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Space Science & Exploration missions through its ultra-affordability, ultra-lightweight, ultra-compact stowage volume, high strength/stiffness, and its high voltage and high/low temperature operation capability within many environments. The ROSA technology will provide NASA/industry a near-term and low-risk solar array system that provides revolutionary performance in terms of high specific power (>200-500 W/kg BOL at the wing level, PV-blanket dependent), affordability (>25-50% projected cost savings at the array level, PV-blanket dependent), ultra-lightweight, high deployed stiffness (10X better than current rigid panel arrays), high deployed strength (10X better than current rigid panel arrays), compact stowage volume (>60-80 kW/m3 BOL, 10X times better than current rigid panel arrays), high deployment reliability and operation reliability, high radiation tolerance, high voltage operation capability (>200 VDC), scalability (500W to 100's of kW), and LILT & HIHT operation capability (LILT – Low Intensity Low Temperature, HIHT – High Intensity High Temperature).

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Non-NASA space applications are comprised of practically all missions that require high-efficiency photovoltaic power production through deployment of an ultra-lightweight and highly-modular structural system. The technology is particularly suited for SEP missions that require game-changing performance in terms of affordability, ultra-lightweight, and compact stowage volume. Applicable non-NASA space missions include: LEO surveillance, reconnaissance, communications and other critical payload/equipment satellites, LEO commercial mapping and critical payload/equipment satellites, MEO satellites & space-tugs, GEO commercial communications and critical payload/equipment satellites, and GEO communications and payload/equipment satellites. The proposed technology also has tremendous dual-use non-space commercial private-sector applicability including fixed-ground and deployable/retractable mobile-ground based systems.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
NASA space applications are comprised of practically all Exploration, Space Science, Earth Science, Planetary Surface, and other missions that require high-efficiency photovoltaic power production through deployment of an ultra-lightweight and highly-modular structural system. The technology is particularly suited for NASA's SEP missions and other missions that require game-changing performance in terms of affordability, ultra-lightweight, and compact stowage volume. The technology is also well suited for applications requiring scalability/modularity, operability within high radiation environments, high voltage operation, and operation in LILT and HIHT environments.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Conversion
Generation
Sources (Renewable, Nonrenewable)
Project Management
Prototyping
Processing Methods
Coatings/Surface Treatments
Composites
Joining (Adhesion, Welding)
Nanomaterials
Polymers
Deployment
Structures


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T3.01-9817
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion
PROPOSAL TITLE: Advanced Epitaxial Lift-Off Quantum Dot Photovoltaic Devices

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
MicroLink Devices
6457 Howard Street
Niles, IL 60714-3301
(847) 588-3001

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Rochester Institute of Technology
141 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623-5608
(585) 475-2977

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Rao Tatavarti
rtatavarti@mldevices.com
6457 West Howard St
Niles,  IL 60714-3301
(847) 588-3001

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
We propose to develop a high-efficiency, triple-junction, epitaxial lift-off (ELO) solar cell by incorporating quantum dots (QDs) within the current-limiting subcell. We intend to leverage existing QD epitaxy processes developed by the Rochester Institute of Technology and combine this with MicroLink's expertise in multi-junction cell growth and ELO technology. We will employ QDs to enhance the middle cell absorption in a InGaP/GaAs/InGaAs metamorphic IMM cell. Detailed balance calculations indicate that the triple junction efficiency can be increased to ~42% by reducing the bandgap of the middle cell to ~1.2 eV. The combination of the QD technology with multi-junction ELO technology will be exploited in two ways: i) ELO GaAs cells with QD can be grown into full triple-junction cells and ii) back-surface reflectors on the ELO cells will be used to improve absorption by routing IR light for a second pass through the QD subcell. The relevance of this work to NASA is that it will result in lightweight, high-efficiency, triple-junction solar cells that will have a specific power > 500 W/kg. In addition, the use of QDs has been shown to improve radiation tolerance of the photovoltaic device.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The lightweight, high efficiency solar cells to be developed in this program can be used in the following non-NASA applications: replacement for conventional triple junction cells on spacecraft, solar-powered high altitude, long endurance (HALE) aircraft, solar blankets for terrestrial power generation, and terrestrial solar concentrators.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
When fully developed, the quantum dot solar cells will be suitable for use in the following NASA applications: replacement for conventional triple junction cells on spacecraft, solar panels for next generation solar electric propulsion (SEP) spacecraft, and solar-powered high altitude, long endurance (HALE) aircraft.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Manufacturing Methods
Materials (Insulator, Semiconductor, Substrate)
Generation
Sources (Renewable, Nonrenewable)
Microfabrication (and smaller; see also Electronics; Mechanical Systems; Photonics)
Nonspecified
Materials & Structures (including Optoelectronics)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T3.01-9864
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion
PROPOSAL TITLE: Solid-fueled Micro Colloid Thruster

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
TDA Research, Inc.
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916
(303) 940-2347

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Colorado, Boulder
572 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309-0572
(303) 492-7110

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
James Nabity
nabity@tda.com
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge,  CO 80212-1916
(303) 940-2313

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Nanosatellites are receiving increased interest since they are proving reliable for surveillance, communication and other space missions. Also, the possibility of launching "constellations" of them offers unique capabilities for low-cost experimentation, sensing and communications in space. In comparison to larger spacecraft, their development time and costs have reduced and their launch costs are low. As a result several agencies have recently launched nanosats to test their ability to perform different missions. Unfortunately, none of these nanosats have had onboard propulsion systems, which would provide greater flexibility to position the satellite throughout the mission. There are several promising thruster concepts for nanosats which could provide attitude control and orbital transfer maneuvers (uN to mN thrust levels, respectively). Of these, the colloid thruster is most attractive since it is highly efficient even when scaled down to the micro scale. However, further development is still needed to meet the power, weight and volume constraints for fitment within a nanosat. Therefore, TDA Research, Inc. and the University of Colorado-Boulder propose to develop a solid-fueled micro colloid thruster. In Phase I we will melt a solid salt and supply it to the micro volcano emitter that will be used in Taylor cone experiments to determine its operating characteristics and evaluate its overall performance.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Agencies other than NASA have also been exploring the use of nanosats. For example, the Army Space and Missile Defense Command - Operational Nanosatellite Effect (SMDC-ONE) nanosats were recently launched into Low Earth Orbit and then used to transmit data from one ground station to another throughout the 35 day mission. However, the SMDC-ONE nanosats use permanent magnets for passive attitude control and therefore tumble as they orbit the earth, which compromises signal quality. The nanosats also have no capability to maintain orbit or transfer to a new orbit, which limits their mission duration to weeks rather than months or years if they are used in low earth orbits. Therefore, a near-term product improvement will be to replace the magnets with an active micro thruster system such as the micro colloid thruster proposed herein.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
This project will develop a solid-propellant micro colloid thruster for use in micro/nanosats, especially those based on the standard 1U CubeSAT configuration. None of the nanosats launched so far have had onboard propulsion, even though it would have been useful for attitude control and to keep the nanosat on a specific flight path. For this reason, the micro colloid thruster system to be developed by TDA will greatly increase nanosat performance and especially, the functionality of constellations of nanosats where precise positioning to one another is extremely important. We will utilize our technical results and Aerojet's thruster manufacturing model to support their marketing of our micro colloid thruster to NASA and other organizations currently developing nanosat systems.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) and smaller
Maneuvering/Stationkeeping/Attitude Control Devices


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T3.01-9950
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion
PROPOSAL TITLE: Controlled Canfield Joint as Improved Gimbal for Flywheel Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Balcones Technologies, LLC
10532 Grand Oak Circle
Austin, TX 78750-3851
(512) 918-1496

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Texas - Center for Electromechanics
P.O. Box 7726
Austin, TX 78713-7726
(512) 471-6424

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Joseph Beno
j.beno@cem.utexas.edu
10532 Grand Oak Circle
Austin,  TX 78750-3851
(512) 918-1496

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Balcones Technologies, LLC proposes to adapt technologies developed by and resident in The University of Texas at Austin Center for Electromechanics (CEM) in the areas of dynamically controlled precision actuators and flywheel energy storage systems to address STTR 2011-1 Subtopic T3.01, Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion. In particular, our team will develop a concept design for a replacement to traditional flywheel gimbal systems that is based on a parallel kinematic structure proposed by Dr. Canfield in approximately 1997 as a carpal wrist joint, now commonly known as the Canfield Joint. The intended result will be a concept for an actively controlled Canfield-Joint Gimbal Replacement System (CGRS) that is considerably less expensive, simpler, and more reliable than current gimbal technology; does not require slip rings for power and control cables; does not have singularity issues, such as gimbal lock; and has relatively simple controls based on analytical kinematic solutions. Our proposed Phase I project will fully evaluate requirements, develop appropriate simulations of the kinematics and control system for a flywheel with magnetic bearings in the CGRS, develop a concept design of the CGRS, develop a commercialization and production plan, and develop a Phase II program plan to demonstrate the system with an existing high-speed flywheel system on magnetic bearings.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Similar to the NASA applications, our Canfield Joint Gimbal Replacement System will have applications across the full spectrum of gimbal applications, especially in commercial and military satellites. Additionally, the controlled Canfield Joint will be designed with a range of motion, load capacity, precision, and accuracy that is compatible with many common and special purpose commercial manufacturing applications, especially those that benefit from very smooth, complex, and accurate positioning of relatively high loads. Finally, telescope systems will benefit from use of the Canfield Joint developed in our proposed program to replace their common use of hexapod positioning systems that have known singularity and control issues.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Our Canfield Joint Gimbal Replacement System will have applications across the full spectrum of NASA gimbal applications. The system can be configured to be passive or active, eliminates many issues and drawbacks with conventional gimbal systems, is more failsafe/reliable than convention gimbal systems and will be less expensive than conventional gimbal systems for high performance applications. Additionally, the CGRS offers simplified, more flexible, robust controls without kinematic singularities and with analytic solutions, which opens up a wide range of industrial applications currently being filled by other types of robotic manipulators (e.g., hexapod/Stewart Platforms). The load carrying capacity and the control system of the CGRS that will likely be the objective of our Phase II proposal will fit many industrial needs and the technology is scalable for much larger and much smaller high-precision and low-precision applications.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Conversion
Distribution/Management
Storage
Actuators & Motors


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T4.01-9792
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Innovative Sensors, Support Subsystems and Detectors for Small Satellite Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: Miniaurizable, High Performance, Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes for Small Satellites

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation
2363 Calle Del Mundo
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1008
(408) 565-9004

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Alabama in Huntsville
Office of the Bursar, UC Room 2`4
Huntsville, AL 35899-5050
(256) 824-2659

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Joey Costa
jc@ifos.com
2363 Calle Del Mundo
Santa Clara,  CA 95054-1008
(408) 565-9000

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Small satellites require much lighter weight, smaller, and long life Attitude control components that can withstand stressing launch conditions and space vibration environments without compromising their performance. In particular, rate sensors that can provide high-resolution Line of Sight (LOS) stabilization, accurate inertial pointing and higher bandwidths are needed to support attitude and position determination from highly compact and very lightweight packages. IFOS, with a team having many years of pioneering experience in innovative Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs), proposes to develop an advanced miniaturizable FOG based on an approach that would allow utilizing drastically reduced size components packageable into high performance attitude control sensor affording high degree of robustness against the shock and vibration that would maintain long term alignment in requisite space environment. IFOS will exploit novel techniques including new fiber components and coil production methods suitable for shorter wavelength operation, and vibration damping concepts that would be compatible with weight of less than 2 lb and volume under 150 cm3 for an Inertial reference Unit (IRU). Phase I will focus on feasibility study of the concept for 1-axis gyro, demonstration of critical components and simulation of vibration damping techniques needed to protect the sensor during launch and long term operation.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed work will significantly benefit the commercial aviation industry as well as sensor arrays for medical applications and homeland security robotic disarming of bombs. Reducing the SWaP and cost of these sensors and improving robustness against harsh environmental risk factors – all without loss of performance - is also critical for many advanced interceptor and satellite platforms that are of interest to DOD and advanced aerospace applications

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Advancement of rate sensor components is essential to support navigation and attitude control systems for advanced NASA satellite missions. The proposed IFOS FOGs will have significantly reduced size and weight with ruggedized components designed to meet stringent dynamic and thermal specifications. A robust, high performance cost-effective gyroscope suitable for space-based operations will also have significant impact on demanding LOS stabilization for NASA applications that require spacecraft stabilized instrumentation platforms for long term space applications. As well as providing weight reduction, the miniaturization enabled by our optical fiber technology is key to diverse spin-off applications such as for sensor matrices in NASA's extra-vehicular and planetary exploration robots for unmanned missions.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Command & Control
Fiber (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Photonics)
Acoustic/Vibration
Inertial
Interferometric (see also Analysis)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T4.01-9886
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Innovative Sensors, Support Subsystems and Detectors for Small Satellite Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: Photonic antenna coupled middlewave infrared photodetector and focal plane array with low noise and high quantum efficiency

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Applied NanoFemto Technologies, LLC
181 Stedmen Street, Unit #2
Lowell, MA 01851-5201
(978) 761-4293

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Massachusetts Lowell
1 University Avenue
Lowell, MA 01854-2827
(978) 934-4723

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Jarrod Vaillancourt
jarrod.vaillancourt@appliednanofemto.com
181 Stedman St. #2
Lowell,  MA 01851-5201
(978) 430-7128

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Middle-wave infrared (MWIR, 3-5 żżm) photodetectors are of great importance in numerous NASA applications, including thermal remote sensing for carbon-based trace gases (CH4, CO2, and CO), heat capacity mapping for earth resource locating, environment and atmosphere monitoring, and IR spectroscopy. However, existing MWIR photodetectors are require a low operating temperature, below 77K to achieve high photodetectivity (D*). The requirement for cryogenic cooling systems adds cost, weight and reliability issues, thereby making it unsuitable for small satellite applications. This STTR project aims to develop a new photonic antenna coupled MWIR photodetector with a significantly enhanced quantum efficiency. In addition, the antenna technology would also allow a large-area signal collection with a small active area of the detector. Successfully developing the proposed innovation is expected to provide an enabling technology for ultra-compact high performance MWIR detection and imaging systems suitable for NASA's small satellite earth remote sensing applications. In phase I, the proposed photonic antenna enhanced MWIR photodetector technology will be evaluated and compared with existing technologies. The proposed photonic antenna structure will be simulated to generate an optimal design. A preliminary photonic antenna coupled MWIR photodetector will be developed for proof-of-concept demonstration. In Phase II, a prototype of the photonic antenna coupled MWIR photodetector will be developed and packaged with supporting electronics and software interfaces for laboratory demonstration.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The high-performance ultra-compact MWIR detector technology is particularly useful in detecting ultra-weak signals for many critical military and homeland security applications such as night vision, missile early launch detection and remote chemical sensing and detection for biological/chemical warfare. Commercial markets include leak detection, chemical process control, remote chemical sensing for atmospheric pollution and drug monitoring, IR spectroscopy, and medical diagnoses. The technology developed herein should considerably accelerate the commercialization of IR camera technologies to meet the potential needs of the huge defense and commercial market.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed photonic antenna coupled MWIR photodetector technology enables ultra-compact high performance MWIR sensing with high quantum efficiency. This technology avoids the bulky and heavy cryogenic cooling system and enables ultra-compact carbon-based trace gases (CH4, CO2, and CO) sensing with substantially reduced device size, weight and power consumption and improved system reliability for small satellite applications. It forms a key building block in IR cameras for numerous NASA's earth remote applications, including space telescope and high-sensitive space object imaging, high definition acquisition of radiation characteristics of Earth and its environments, monitoring of atmospheric variables such as temperature, winds, and trace constituents for understanding and predicting the earth's climate and potential hazards as well as topographical profiling of Earth for mineral identification and vegetation mapping.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Infrared


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T4.01-9902
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Innovative Sensors, Support Subsystems and Detectors for Small Satellite Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: Infrared Microspectrometer based on MEOMS Lamellar Grating Interferometer

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
EPIR Technologies, Inc.
590 Territorial Drive
Bolingbrook, IL 60440-4881
(630) 771-0203

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of California Santa Cruz
Engineering Baskin 350A, 1156 High Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077
(831) 459-2639

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Silviu Velicu
svelicu@epir.com
590 Territorial Drive
Bolingbrook,  IL 60440-4881
(630) 771-0203

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Infrared spectroscopy is an invaluable detection and measurement tool intensively used in Earth Science, Solar Physics and Astrophysics experiments pursued from satellite platforms. The geometrical characteristics and sensitivity of satellite infrared spectroscopy systems is often determined or limited by their optical elements. Improvements in optical components allow one to reduce the mass and increase the sensitivity of the system. Here we propose a compact, high sensitivity sensor based on the integration of HgCdTe photodiode detection technology with micro-opto-electromechanical-systems (MOEMS) technology. This combines HgCdTe's high sensitivity with an inexpensive MOEMS lamellar grating interferometer (LGI) device. During Phase I we will perform the optical and mechanical design of the lamellar grating elements, identify suitable processes for fabrication, demonstrate etch processes compatible with the LGI design, and demonstrate prototype lamellar elements. During Phase II, we will further optimize the LGI components, minimize their size, weight and power, and integrate them into an operational LGI. A prototype LGI instrument will be deployed in an environment with controlled input of a variety of low-level test gases. We will develop and test detection-identification algorithms and build a characterization set-up to assess the LGI's sensitivity, selectivity and probability of detection.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
There are numerous applications for infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the biotechnology, environmental, food/beverage, chemical, pharmaceutical, raw/processed material, and semiconductor industries. These applications are served by the current, commercial FTIR spectroscopic technology based on Michelson interferometers. This technology relies on "bulk" components with a relatively large bench-top footprint. An IR spectrometer using the proposed LGI fabricated with MOEMS technology could significantly reduce the size, weight, complexity, mechanical stability, power consumption, and cost of the instrument. These changes would enable new applications in current markets and in new markets, where some or all of these products characteristics are required. We envision the implementation of the proposed microspectrometers in industrial applications such as process control, temperature monitoring and preventive maintenance; environmental monitoring for pipe leaks, hazardous material spills, automobile exhaust emissions, and non-invasive medical measurements of temperature for detecting tumors and measuring blood flow.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The provision of additional functionalities to infrared detectors will provide new capabilities for associated spectroscopy systems along with the potential to improve system size, weight and performance. Infrared spectroscopy systems, and particularly imaging spectroscopy systems, may be enhanced or simplified by direct spectral discrimination at the infrared detector. The proposed detector arrays could be deployed in a National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and other space-based NASA systems.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) and smaller
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Materials & Structures (including Optoelectronics)
Chemical/Environmental (see also Biological Health/Life Support)
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Infrared
Multispectral/Hyperspectral


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T4.01-9919
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Innovative Sensors, Support Subsystems and Detectors for Small Satellite Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: Multi-functional Optical Subsystem Enabling Laser Communication on Small Satellites

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Arkyd Astronautics, Inc.
1331 118th Avenue South East, Suite 100
Bellevue, WA 98005-3876
(425) 336-2448

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
(617) 253-3906

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Chris Lewicki
chris@arkyd.com
1331 118TH AVE SE STE 100
Bellevue,  WA 98005-3876
(425) 336-2442

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Advancements in technology and contractions in budgets are driving constant increases in spacecraft "capability density." These factors are motivating the design of small spacecraft capable of generating and communicating large amounts of data, over great distances, at low cost. Arkyd Astronautics is a provider of robotic space exploration services and is developing microspacecraft to conduct low cost deep-space missions. Arkyd is currently developing the technology required for implementing small satellite optical communication as a key enabler of our commercial business model. Arkyd proposes to determine the feasibility of developing a novel multi-functional optical subsystem used for attitude determination, stability control, scientific observation and high-precision optical communication on small satellites. If successful, the proposed optical subsystem design design will result in small satellite attitude control and communication performance improvements of several orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art. The proposed effort will leverage technology under development for the MIT/Draper Lab ExoplanetSat to design a TRL 4 system demonstrator capable of sub-arcsecond pointing stability by the completion of Phase I work. Phase II follow-on work will focus on fabrication, assembly, and system testing of a demonstrator for the proposed system. It is the expectation of the proposing team to achieve TRL 6 by the end of Phase II work.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
As communication capability is a common infrastructure element to any meaningful remotely operated platform, there are innumerable potential applications for a low mass, low power optical communications system of the type enabled by the proposed work. A brief list of a few especially attractive applications include: High bandwidth applications for small satellites in LEO * Satellite crosslink communications * HD video from orbit * Low cost Earth observation constellations * Real-time disaster monitoring * Data-rich scientific payloads Low bandwidth applications for small spacecraft in deep-space * NEO detection and exploration * Solar observation * Astronomy observation Terrestrial high-bandwidth data communication * UAVs * Robots/Vehicles These commercial applications can be enabled through direct sales of the multi-functional optical subsystems, licensing of the design for inclusion in other systems, and sales of fully integrated small spacecraft.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The development of a multi-functional optical subsystem enabling high-precision optical communication on small satellites has the potential to enable progress toward several NASA Strategic Goals, Grand Challenges, and Technology Roadmaps: Increasing the capabilities of small spacecraft in LEO through this proposed effort will lower the bar for budgets required to conduct space-based Earth Science, Solar Science, Astronomy, or commercial research, increasing the quantity and quality of scientific output as well as opening the door for commercial space exploration. * NASA Strategic Goal 2: Expand scientific understanding of the Earth and the universe in which we live * NASA Strategic Goal 3: Create the innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future * Grand Challenges: Economical space access * Technology Roadmap: Science instruments, observatories and sensor systems The development of the proposed capability for small spacecraft is an enabling step toward allowing these spacecraft to perform the initial robotic exploration required to gather intelligence as part of an integrated architecture to support follow-on human exploration missions. * NASA Strategic Goal 1: Extend and sustain human activities across the solar system * Grand Challenges: NEO detection and mitigation, telepresence in space, new tools of discovery * Technology Roadmap: Communication and navigation systems, Human exploration destination systems

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Spacecraft Instrumentation & Astrionics (see also Communications; Control & Monitoring; Information Systems)
Transmitters/Receivers
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Isolation/Protection/Shielding (Acoustic, Ballistic, Dust, Radiation, Thermal)
Lasers (Communication)
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T5.01-9789
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Planetary Compositional Analysis and Mapping
PROPOSAL TITLE: Substrate-Enhanced Micro Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Aerodyne Research, Inc.
45 Manning Road
Billerica, MA 01821-3976
(978) 663-9500

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Research Administration Building, 70 Butterfield Terrace
Amherst, MA 01003-9242
(413) 545-0698

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Joda Wormhoudt
jody@aerodyne.com
45 Manning Road
Billerica,  MA 01821-3976
(978) 932-0229

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Aerodyne Research, Inc. and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will collaborate to develop laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis of organic analytes of interest in planetary exploration, based on microchip laser illumination. The key advantage of microchip lasers in this application is their much smaller size and weight than lasers used to date for LDI. These lasers have not been used because they have much smaller pulse energies than currently used LDI lasers. We propose to investigate the use of LDI substrates with special properties that include lowering the laser fluence required for LDI. Our Phase I candidate substrate will be gold nanoparticles coated with functionalized monolayers. Coated nanoparticles have been shown to have significant advantages in LDI applications, including selectivity of analyte adsorption, and enhancement of desorption via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effects.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
An example of a non-NASA application we would pursue if our intial work succeeded is bacteria identification, of key importance to DOD, DHS, and public health agencies with needs in identifying bacterial warfare agents, and infectious microorganisms involved in water contamination, food poisoning and infectious diseases. A technique such as that proposed here that led to a field-capable instrument should find initial adopters in DOD and DHS laboratories and in hospitals.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
NASA's goals in astrobiology begin with characterizing extraterrestrial chemistry, particularly the presence of complex organic molecules and any molecular signs of life or indications of prebiotic chemistry. This has led to NASA interest in novel approaches that could help enable in situ organic compound analysis from a robot arm (such as ultra-miniaturized Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry). The microchip lasers that are our focus in this proposal are far smaller than laser used in LDI instrumentation to date, and their small size will not only allow but require miniaturization of the entire apparatus.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Instruments (Solid, Liquid, Gas, Plasma, Energy; see also Sensors)
Lasers (Measuring/Sensing)
Biological Signature (i.e., Signs Of Life)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T5.01-9835
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Planetary Compositional Analysis and Mapping
PROPOSAL TITLE: Uncooled near- and mid-IR spectrometer engine.

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
AGILTRON Corporation
15 Presidential Way
Woburn, MA 01801-1040
(781) 935-1200

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Yale University
Becton Center 309; 15 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06520-8284
(202) 432-0683

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Jae Ryu
jryu@agiltron.com
15 Presidential Way
Woburn,  MA 01801-1040
(781) 935-1200

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Agiltron proposes to develop an extremely compact and high sensitivity uncooled near- and mid-infrared (NMIR) spectrometer engine for planetary compositional analysis and mapping. In this program, we will produce lead salt-based IR detector materials with single crystalline-like oriented thin film structures which will increase the majority charge carrier mobility by two orders of magnitude. Exceptionally high charge carrier mobility will significantly improve photosensitivity and greatly reduce noise of the IR detectors and detector arrays. We will produce this unique thin film structure by employing so called "nano-graphoepitaxy", in which lead salt thin films are deposited on nanoengineered substrates, then followed by sensitizing them in controlled process conditions. Micro-grooved substrates will further enhance photon absorption efficiency via the ray optics. Furthermore, we will design and develop an extremely compact and high spectral resolution spectrometer engine by employing an aperiodic nanostructure-based spectrometer platform. In Phase I, we will design, fabricate and test nanoengineered NMIR detector materials and arrays. We will also conceptually design the aperiodic nanostructure-based spectrometer for NMIR applications. In Phase II, we will produce and evaluate the performance of a prototype uncooled near- and mid-IR spectrometer engine by integrating the high sensitivity detector arrays into the aperiodic nanostructured spectrometer platform.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Industries typically rely on using a small number of high-priced IR spectrometers to handle their process-monitoring needs. Though a single system can be used to monitor several processes simultaneously through multiplexing, it is costly to set up and risky if equipment failure occurs. Compact and inexpensive IR spectrometers can be assembled to operate over the important 1-5 m spectral range by using PbS and PbSe detector arrays. Current PbS and PbSe detector arrays; however, have limitations of relatively low sensitivity and high background noise, partially due to low carrier mobility of 1-5 cm2/V-S. By significantly increasing the carrier mobility, expected to be about 500 cm2/V-S, we can produce mid-IR detector arrays and spectrometers with exceptionally high detectivity and SNR. The compact, affordable NMIR spectrometer to be developed in this program should find many commercial applications in the areas of industry process control and analytical characterization of food, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
By achieving exceptionally high carrier mobility, the proposed PbS and PbSe detector array will exhibit superior uncooled detectivity and signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the spectral range of 1-5 m. Furthermore, the resulting NMIR spectrometer engine will be compact, reliable, and have high detectivity, high spectral resolution and low power consumption. Therefore, both the NMIR detector array and spectrometer engine to be developed in this program will have immediate applications for NASA's many current and future planetary missions, including in-situ composition analyses of the planetary atmospheres. The compact and high spectral resolution uncooled spectrometer engine will be an invaluable tool to actively investigate planetary atmospheres from both on-ground, such as Mars Rovers, and orbit platforms. The NMIR detector array with superior detectivity and SNR will also be an invaluable tool for both remote sensing and imaging applications from space and orbit platforms.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Methods
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Infrared


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T5.01-9938
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Planetary Compositional Analysis and Mapping
PROPOSAL TITLE: Lab-on-a-Robot Platform for in-situ Planetary Compositional Analysis

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
HJ Science & Technology, Inc.
187 Saratoga Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95050-6657
(408) 464-3873

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Texas, San Antonio
One UTSA Circle
San Antonio, TX 78249-1644
(210) 458-7428

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Hong Jiao
hong_jiao@yahoo.com
187 Saratoga Avenue
Santa Clara,  CA 95050-6657
(408) 464-3873

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
HJ Science & Technology, Inc. and the University of Texas at San Antonio propose a joint venture to demonstrate the feasibility of a mobile "lab-on-a-robot" platform capable of in-situ, high throughput, and simultaneous identification and characterization of universal classes of ions, molecules, and biomolecules for NASA planetary and small body surface chemistry studies. The innovation of the proposed technology combines contactless conductivity detection, on-chip automated sample processing, miniaturized instrumentation integration, and robotic and wireless technologies. If successful, such a mobile platform for the miniaturized instrument will lay the groundwork for future NASA in situ robotic missions. In Phase I, we will show the basic functionalities of the proposed technology by demonstrating the capability of (1) the contactless conductivity detection to detect selective ions that are relevant to the aqueous chemistry and reactivity of the Martian surface material, (2) controlling the device as well as collecting and analyzing the data wirelessly, and (3) integrating the contactless conductivity detection technology into our current optical detection based instrumentation. In Phase II, the main effort will direct towards the development of a "lab-on-a-robot" prototype to be delivered to JPL, which will include optical and contactless conductivity detection capabilities, wireless communication, and on-chip automated sample processing.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed "lab-on-a-robot" has broader commercial applications including monitoring environmental pollutants that are a potential concern for human health on Earth. The proposed technology is particularly relevant to in-situ analysis of environmental samples because currently the samples have to be physically acquired, transported, and then processed in the laboratory. Exposure of personnel to untested environments, sample degradation, contamination, and labor-intensive analytical protocols obviate the necessity for testing systems capable of performing on-site analysis and transmit the results autonomously. Compared with conventional laboratory based measurement techniques, the in-situ measurement capability of our portable platform offers important advantages including reduction in time and cost, real-time data for better and more timely decision making, and reduction in sample consumption.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed "lab-on-a-robot" technology has great potential for NASA in-situ planetary and small body surface chemistry studies. In particular, the mobile platform in conjunction with the contactless conductivity detection is ideally suited for simultaneous inorganic ion detection and analysis complementary to the "lab-on-a-chip" miniaturization of MECA's wet chemistry laboratory at JPL. The successful research effort will result in reduction in size, weight, power consumption, and cost of in-situ space probes. In addition, the proposed technology can also be used for on-chip biosensors, electrochemical sensors, on-chip sample separations, reactions, derivatizations, as well as for fluid positioning, mixing, metering, storage, and filtering systems, clinical diagnostics, spacecraft and biosphere environmental monitoring, and toxicology studies.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Instruments (Solid, Liquid, Gas, Plasma, Energy; see also Sensors)
Analytical Methods
Biological Signature (i.e., Signs Of Life)
Chemical/Environmental (see also Biological Health/Life Support)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T6.01-9863
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Affordable and Sustainable Crew Support and Protection
PROPOSAL TITLE: A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
TDA Research, Inc.
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916
(303) 940-2347

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Colorado at Boulder
572 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309-0572
(303) 492-7110

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Jim Nabity
nabity@tda.com
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge,  CO 80033-1916
(303) 940-2313

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the cabin (both air and its structure if manned) and electronic equipment within a narrow temperature range even though the environment may vary from very cold to warmer than room temperature. Since water is safe to use and an excellent coolant (other than its high freeze point and volumetric expansion during freeze), a water coolant loop often is used to transport heat to or from the spacecraft via heat exchangers to the heat sink systems that reject heat to space. Some of the heat exchangers would freeze, particularly the ones transporting heat to a flash evaporator or cold radiators exposed to deep space, if not for system controls to prevent it. Yet, the principle of allowing a heat exchanger to freeze can be utilized to increase the turn-down of the heat rejection rate (e.g. to vary the heat rejection from radiators). Unfortunately, the expansion during the phase change of water to ice may damage and ultimately fail the heat exchanger if it is not designed to withstand this event. TDA Research, Inc. has been developing water/ice phase change heat exchangers for several years, since the thermal control system can be simpler (a secondary loop between the coolant water loop and the heat sink systems may no longer be needed) and smaller in size while reducing the use of consumables. Therefore, TDA Research and the University of Colorado propose a lightweight and freeze tolerant water/ice heat exchanger that can passively regulate the heat rejection rate from the water coolant loop to the heat sink systems. The heat exchanger will have no moving parts and thus will be extremely reliable. In Phase I, we will design and build a freeze tolerant water/ice heat exchanger without resorting to a large heavy-walled structure and then subject it to hundreds of freeze/thaw cycles to verify its integrity.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The largest and nearest term commercial applications are the use of freeze tolerant tubing on earth. These earth-based applications include sprinkler systems and potable water supply in homes and commercial buildings. This market is potentially very large and virtually un-tapped because of the lack of a viable freeze tolerant tube. The Insurance Institute for Property Loss Reduction, says frozen pipes have cost the insurance companies in the USA $4.2 billion in damage to insured homes and buildings over the past decade (i.e., about $400,000,000 per year). The savings in insurance rates alone could more than offset the cost to the user, who would have the added benefit of not having valuables destroyed by water damage and their lives disturbed during repairs of the water damage.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
A water coolant loop is usually part of the thermal control system for manned spacecraft. The water loop then interfaces with a Freon or ammonia loop to reject heat to the heat sink systems. A simpler approach would be to design the water coolant heat exchangers to be freeze tolerant and utilize the phase change of water to ice as part of the thermal control system. This would eliminate the need for a second heavier fluid loop using Freon or ammonia (heavier because these fluids are poorer heat transfer media). Further, a water/ice heat exchanger can use the buildup of ice to self-regulate heat transport from the spacecraft to space. This approach to thermal control should result in a safer and more reliable system. In spacesuits, a freeze tolerant heat exchanger/radiator system will dramatically reduce (by roughly 75%) the single largest consumable during EVA. A spacesuit radiator can replace the PLSS covering with very little net increase in weight and yet will cut the amount of water needed to cool the astronaut during an EVA by up to 6 lbs. This will represent a significant cost savings to future missions and especially in Lunar and Mars EVA missions where the reduction in water loss is not merely nice, it is essential.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Lifetime Testing
Heat Exchange
Passive Systems


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T6.01-9901
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Affordable and Sustainable Crew Support and Protection
PROPOSAL TITLE: Compact, Regenerable, Low Power Adsorber for Spacesuit CO2, Humidity, and Trace Contaminant Control

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Precision Combustion, Inc.
410 Sackett Point Road
North Haven, CT 06473-3106
(203) 287-3700

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Hartford
200 Bloomfield Avenue
Hartford, CT 06117-1545
(860) 768-2429

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Saurabh Vilekar
svilekar@precision-combustion.com
410 Sackett Point Road
North Haven,  CT 06473-3106
(203) 287-3700

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Current approaches planned for space suit atmosphere revitalization (AR) are neither compatible with each other nor regenerable in space, and have a high life cycle operating cost associated with them. The proposed PCI innovation in collaboration with University of Hartford involves synthesizing improved sorbents on high surface area supports tailored for CO2, water and trace contaminant removal. Phase I effort will demonstrate proof of concept – developing appropriate methods for coating high capacity sorbents on high surface area supports, scalability of the approach with high bed utilization, maximizing sorption capacity resulting in ultra-compact sorption adsorber, rapid regeneration to vacuum and an operating demonstration on a bench scale; representing significant advances over current state-of-the art AR methods.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Commercial applications of this technology will be in the manufacture of light weight, compact and scalable Adsorber modules for use in air purification systems, including those found in crew cabins or enclosed spaces such commercial airplanes, submarines, operating rooms, ships, and industrial process control rooms. Regenerative personnel protective devices against toxic gas, airborne toxins or biological agents would be an application for small scale versions of the adsorber system. Industrial applications such as semiconductor manufacture where solvents or emissions are a concern would be potential larger scale application areas. Following successful development of a scalable system on Microlith®, some major spin off applications would be investigated by PCI in the area of selective adsorption and desorption/oxidation cycles during automotive engine cold starts. In the manufacture of chemicals, targeted constituent capture through cyclic adsorption/desorption and integrated catalytic reactor elements may permit active, "selective" catalytic reactors to enhance product yields.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
A common modular approach to air revitalization for all levels of activity – from EMU suits, ground-based crew cabins, ground vehicles, on up to spacecrafts.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Protective Clothing/Space Suits/Breathing Apparatus


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T6.02-9807
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Active Debris Removal Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: Active Debris Removal (ADR) System Architecture Analysis Tool (SAAT) Prototype for Orbital Debris Stabilization and Removal Architecture Development

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Poulos Air & Space
2010 Gates Avenue, Unit A
Redondo Beach, CA 90278-1905
(310) 594-5009

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Systems Engineering Program, USAF Academy
12354 Fairchild Drive, Room 6H140
USAFA, CO 80840-6208
(719) 333-1187

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Dennis Poulos
dpoulos@pouloscorp.com
2010 Gates Ave., Unit A
Redondo Beach,  CA 90278-1905
(310) 594-5009

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
It is critically important that a physics based ADR SAAT prototype be developed that can be refined and used across the community to study and analyze various remote (non-contact) orbital debris stabilization concepts and architectures prior to investing significant commercial or public funding into technology development, technology and system level demonstrations, and development and deployment of an Orbital Debris Stabilization/ADR system. Under this STTR, PA&S plans to develop a prototype Active Debris Removal System Architecture Analysis Tool (ADR SAAT) that we will use as the basis for the detailed architectural and business case analysis. The focus of this effort will be to selected and implement a core integrated architecture framework based on a SOA, adapt it as necessary, and develop the initial models, functions and interfaces necessary to develop the ADR SAAT prototype. The goal will be to provide the tool to NASA for community-wide development and use and which PA&S can adapt and use for detailed architectural analyses to define operating parameters, costs, and system level requirements. The intent of a Phase II effort would be to validate ADR SAAT with ground or flight experiments, continue to enhance its capabilities, and for detailed Debris Stabilization / Active Debris Removal Architecture analysis.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
PA&S expects that NASA, DoD, or other international entity's will evolved into a customer for commercial ADR services evolves over the next 5 to 10 years. We feel that services providers must begin now to develop the technologies, systems, and capabilities to address that commercial opportunity. ADR SAAT, the product of this STTR, will be a critical element of commercializing a system designed to stabilize unstable space debris and to actively reposition or remove those debris objects. The ADR SAAT will allow PA&S, NASA, and other entities to perform the systems engineering trades and analyses to optimize their technologies, develop system level requirements, and develop business cases, all critical elements in developing a business case to attract commercial investment. The flexibility afforded by a well-designed integrated framework will allow ADR SAAT to further be used to support prototyping, hardware in the loop testing, software in the loop testing, and system level simulations and modeling. Overall, it would be difficult, if not impossible to develop a commercial Active Debris Removal system without a capability such as ADR SAAT.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
NASA will inevitably be one of the principal agencies tasked to development and implement methods for Orbital Debris Active Debris Removal. However, NASA's main mission is primarily exploration and scientific research. As such, we would expect NASA to manage commercialization of orbital debris mitigation and active debris removal efforts as a service, rather than as a primary mission. Further development of ADR SAAT following Phase I will be focused on using it to generate credible data to support a business case analysis of various orbital debris stabilization and removal concepts and technologies. Since we will have developed the ADR SAAT architecture with the flexibility to use it in hardware-in-the-loop and software-in-the-loop simulations, we will expand its capabilities in follow-on phases to use it as a test bed for developing Mission Planners, control algorithms, and for on the ground testing of in-flight hardware and software for system level demonstrations an experiments to prove the concept of non-contact debris stabilization. Ultimately, we envision that ADR SAAT will be viewed as an industry standard analysis package that can be used by government and commercial entities, as well as PA&S, for analysis, simulation, test and evaluation of Active Debris Removal systems and concepts.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Methods
Navigation & Guidance
Relative Navigation (Interception, Docking, Formation Flying; see also Control & Monitoring; Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Space Transportation & Safety
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Intelligence
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Attitude Determination & Control
Command & Control
Sequencing & Scheduling
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Prototyping
Software Tools (Analysis, Design)
Data Fusion
Data Modeling (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Knowledge Management
Deployment
Vehicles (see also Autonomous Systems)
Maneuvering/Stationkeeping/Attitude Control Devices
Verification/Validation Tools
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T6.02-9880
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Active Debris Removal Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: Enabling Large-body Active Debris Removal

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
VectorNav Technologies, LLC
903 North Bowser Road, Suite 200
Richardson, TX 75081-2897
(512) 772-3615

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University
3141 TAMU
College Station, TX 77845-3141
(979) 845-7541

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
John Junkins
junkins@tamu.edu
3141 TAMU
College Station,  TX 77845-3141
(979) 845-3912

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Research suggests that: (1) orbital debris has reached an unstable point whereby, even with no future launches, the amount of debris will continue to grow through collisions among large-body debris, and (2) removing as few as five large objects each year can stabilize debris growth. For large-body active debris removal (ADR), active technologies are required to safely and efficiently stabilize and capture the target debris. The interactions of these complex electromechanical systems (eg. imaging systems, LIDAR, robotic arms and grippers, etc) and control algorithms pose challenges best addressed by hardware-in-the-loop testing. Given the risks inherent in non-cooperative spacecraft proximity operations, and the firm requirement that ADR missions do not themselves produce additional debris, realistic ground-based testing is required for risk reduction. Testing space operations in ground-based facilities is notoriously difficult and limited. Our proposed approach significantly increases the capability and fidelity of such testing operations and elevates the chance of a successful ADR mission. We propose a combination of robotic technologies to allow for a large range of relative motion simulation with accurate contact dynamics. First, the target debris object is suspended from a thin rod and spun up to a desired rotational speed. The suspension point is actively controlled to remove the periodic pendulum effect while still allowing free motion from contact, and a universal joint permits free rotational motion. Second, the chaser spacecraft is mounted atop HOMER, an omnidirectional robot capable of unlimited planar motion and limited-range out-of-plane motion. HOMER was designed and built by Texas A&M to emulate the 6-DOF relative-motion trajectories common in spacecraft proximity operations. Along with careful attention paid to the design of mock-targets, these two systems will allow for large-scale motion with accurate contact dynamics for high-fidelity ADR testing.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The advanced capabilities of the LASR Lab to provide high-fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop testing is broadly applicable to any spacecraft proximity operations mission, as is the know-how generated by the Mock Target Trade Study by VectorNav. VectorNav and the LASR Lab will be able to provide extensive support and testing facilities for a wide range of customers, both commercial and governmental. Missions supported include among others: GEO refueling, on-orbit servicing, and fractionated spacecraft.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Realistic ground-based testing of spacecraft proximity operations provides significant risk reduction for any active debris removal mission. The LASR Lab is uniquely capable of providing full 6-DOF relative motion capabilities at low cost. The testing and validation of the high-accuracy 6-DOF feedback tracking on HOMER, combined with the pendulum-based equivalent of a 5-DOF air bearing, will certify LASR Lab as a world-class test facility - a true dynamics version of a wind tunnel. VectorNav plans to serve as a commercial partner to LASR Lab, providing design of experiments support whenever customers contract with the LASR Lab for testing. The details gleaned from the Mock Target Trade Study places VectorNav in a prime position to design realistic experiments for a wide variety of customers at LASR Lab and other simulation facilities.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Relative Navigation (Interception, Docking, Formation Flying; see also Control & Monitoring; Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Inertial
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T7.01-9791
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Ground Effects of Launch Acoustics
PROPOSAL TITLE: High Performance Acousto-Optic Arrays based on Fiber Bragg Gratings for Measuring Launch Acoustics

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation
2363 Calle Del Mundo
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1008
(408) 565-9004

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
New Mexico Tech
801 Leroy Place
Socorro, NM 87801-4681
(575) 835-5646

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Vahid Sotoudeh
vs@ifos.com
2363 Calle Del Mundo
Santa Clara,  CA 95054-1008
(408) 565-9000

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations in acousto-optic sensor development for measurement of launch acoustics on space vehicle and ground structures. The proposed sensor platform provides an ultra-light-weight, ultra-high-speed, multi-channel, optical fiber sensor array system for acoustics measurements. The project goals are to design an ultra-high-speed/high resolution, small footprint fiber Bragg grating (FBG) acousto-optic sensor array plus the interrogator, construct a system model, test platform and develop signal processing algorithms to identify and measure acoustic signals in the presence of a quasi-static background strain field. The system model will demonstrate proof-of-principle and the test results will provide proof-of-functionality of the proposed sensor system for measurement of vehicle and ground effects of launch acoustics including using the advanced signal processing algorithms. IFOS and its collaborators in this project will develop a Phase 2 strategy plan that includes development and integration strategy, potential demonstration opportunities, program schedule, and estimated costs.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Many non-NASA commercial markets exist that can realize significant benefits from this new technology for highly integrated/synergistic structures in the aerospace, automobile, and infrastructure industries. Commercial aviation, the oil and gas industry and land and marine vehicles will benefit significantly from this technology.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The primary market for the application of this technology will be a verification and validation tool for the NASA's ground support equipments (GSE) and launch pad structures designs to withstand the launch-induced environments produced by the first-stage rocket exhaust plume.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Fiber (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Photonics)
Gratings
Acoustic/Vibration
Sensor Nodes & Webs (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T7.02-9773
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Payload Integration and Payload Launch Preparation Interface Standards
PROPOSAL TITLE: Integrated Vibration and Acceleration Testing to Reduce Payload Mass, Cost and Mission Risk

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
American Aerospace Advisors, Inc
1279 Gulph Creek Drive
Radnor, PA 19807-4687
(610) 225-2604

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Drexel University
3201 Arch Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875
(215) 895-2000

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
David Yoel
dyoel@american-aerospace.net
1279 Gulph Creek Dr
Radnor,  PA 19807-4687
(610) 225-2604

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
We propose to develop a capability to provide integrated acceleration, vibration, and shock testing using a state-of-the-art centrifuge, allowing for the test of synergistic effects of these combined environments. By installing a shaker table on the centrifuge, the test setup can provide both sustained and dynamic-g loads as well as simultaneous vibration loads, in two independent axes. This method will provide more realistic launch environments for testing launch payloads. By providing a more realistic test environment, combined environment testing has the potential to reduce cost, save time, reducing risk and increase performance. Launch vibration data for a Terrior-Orion two-stage suborbital sounding rocket was used as a basis for analysis. The data presents a typical launch load environment in that two main loads exist: 1) sustained-g load from acceleration of the rocket, and 2) random vibration and shock loads. The current fixed-table vibration test devices are incapable of simulating both of these loads at the same time. Accordingly, the current test methodologies typically overstress the payload to ensure that the system survives the launch loads. By enabling the proposed capability to test payloads by simultaneously applying sustained-g and vibration loads, we can more closely simulate the actual launch conditions, resulting in risk, schedule and cost reduction.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Beyond the space market, airborne GNC systems and subsystems may also benefit from combined environments testing.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
AAAI and NASTAR believe a significant market exists for combined environments testing once the capability is demonstrated and a full understanding of the benefits are communicated to the space test standards and space system development communities. Launch vehicle subsystems that can benefit from combined environments testing include: 1) Flight termination systems 2) Guidance navigation and control systems and subsystems 3) Mechanical and electromechanical devices 4) Fluid systems and components 5) Separation systems and components 6) Structural components In addition, spacecraft applications of combined environments testing include: 1) Complete small satellites 2) Guidance navigation and control systems and subsystems 3) Mechanical and electromechanical devices 4) Fluid systems and components 5) Separation systems and components 6) Structural components

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE; NDT)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T7.03-9842
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Flexible Polymer Foams Systems for Fireproofing and Energy Absorption
PROPOSAL TITLE: New Flexible FR Polyurethane Foams for Energy Absorption Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Gordon Nelson and Associates
2283 Hamlet Drive
Melbourne, FL 32934-7609
(321) 255-1163

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Florida Institute of Technology
150 West University Boulevard
Melbourne, FL 32901-6975
(321) 674-7239

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Feng Yang
fyang@fit.edu
150 W. University Blvd
Melbourne,  FL 32901-6975
(321) 674-7290

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Development of new polyurethane (PU) insulation foams through a non-toxic environmentally friendly composite approach. Target FR foams will exhibit high heat flow resistance as well as lower density than conventional PU. Foams involve synergism between novel phosphonate FRs and smoke suppression agents coupled with use of aerogel. Preliminary data show peak heat release rates reduced by 50% versus PU, smoke equal to PU and ignition times delayed from 25 to 143 seconds.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Other allied applications for high performance foam (Non-NASA)

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Cost effective Flexible Polyurethane Foams for Cryogenic insulation (NAA) Fireproofing (NASA) Energy absorption (NASA) Other Aerospace applications (NASA)

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Composites
Polymers


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T7.03-9884
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Flexible Polymer Foams Systems for Fireproofing and Energy Absorption
PROPOSAL TITLE: Highly Flexible, Fire Resistant HybridSil Foams for Next Generation Fireproofing, Insulation, and Energy Absorption NASA Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Nanosonic, Inc.
158 Wheatland Drive
Pembroke, VA 24136-3645
(540) 626-6266

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Virginia Tech
107 Davidson Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0001
(540) 231-8226

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Vince Barnauskas
vince@nanosonic.com
158 Wheatland Drive
Pembroke,  VA 24136-3645
(540) 626-6266

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The objective of this Phase I STTR program is to adapt NanoSonic's HybridSil&#153; nanocomposite technology for the creation of next generation highly flexible, fire resistant foams capable of extended operational lifetimes within demanding aerospace platforms. Phase I optimized nanocomposite foams would have immediate utility within a broad spectrum NASA applications as non-halogenated fire proofing, insulative, de-icing, and energy absorptive materials with tailorable breathabilities. To that end, NanoSonic and Dr. James McGrath's research group of Virginia Tech will work to design, optimize, and scale-up a family of highly flexible polyimide-polyorganosiloxane HybridSil&#153; foams with statistically optimized cell content, mechanical durability, thermooxidative resilience, gas permeability, flexibility, and flame retardancy. This program will build from established non-halogenated, high temperature HybridSil&#153; technology that has passed the ISO 9705 room corner burn test to obtain qualification as "fire restricting" per the International Maritime Organization, demonstrated a flame spread rating of zero (ASTM E-84), yielded thermal conductivities below commercially available polyurethane foams (< 50 mW/mK), and elastomeric resilience (recovery from 1000 % deformation) from ballistic / blast impact threats . Rapid Phase III transition to commercial integration will be facilitated through an established HybridSil&#153; pilot scale manufacturing infrastructure capable of producing > 8,000 lbs. resin / day.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
In addition to meeting the solicitation specified cryogenic insulation, fireproofing, energy absorption, ice mitigation, and acoustic attenuation applications for NASA vehicle, ground, and umbilical systems, the proposed polyimide HybridSil&#153; nanocomposite foams will have broad utility within additional defense and commercial applications. Most immediately, NanoSonic's non-halogenated fire resistant foams may be used to provide next generation thermal insulation and energy efficiency within commercial and residential buildings. Specifically, the proposed nanocomposite foam technology will serve as a replacement for currently employed polyurethane foams yet provide orders of magnitude greater thermal insulation, environmentally friendly VOC-free spray deposition processes, validated non-halogenated flame protection, negligible smoke toxicity, and superior mechanical durability. Additionally, insulation systems around high temperature automotive and aerospace structures would provide increased lifetimes for a range of subcomponent systems. A secondary market interest with insulative clothing, protective equipment padding, and tent ensembles may be realized as well.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
NanoSonic's Phase I optimized HybridSil&#153; insulative coatings will serve as a replacement for currently employed polyurethane and polyimide foams yet provide enhanced fire retardancy, elastomeric flexibility, insulation, impact dissipation, acoustic attenuation, and ice mitigation for a broad range of NASA vehicle, ground, and umbilical support platforms. Additional NASA specific applications include protective clothing and electronic insulation applications. The proposed polyimide HybridSilTM nanocomposite foams will be an extension of NanoSonic's tailorable, high performance HybridSilTM polymer nanocomposite technology which has recently received the R&D 100 Award. Of particular importance to fire resistance and flexibility, the base copolymer technology has independently validated fire and blast protective properties and is currently transitioning to pilot scale manufacturing through a U.S. Navy Commercialization Pilot Program. Thus, the manufacturing infrastructure necessary for pilot scalability will be in place during the onset of the Phase I program and provide a driver for near term Phase III NASA integration pathways.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Air Transportation & Safety
Entry, Descent, & Landing (see also Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Space Transportation & Safety
Fire Protection
Isolation/Protection/Radiation Shielding (see also Mechanical Systems)
Protective Clothing/Space Suits/Breathing Apparatus
Cables/Fittings
Materials (Insulator, Semiconductor, Substrate)
Distribution/Management
Storage
Aerogels
Coatings/Surface Treatments
Composites
Nanomaterials
Polymers
Smart/Multifunctional Materials
Isolation/Protection/Shielding (Acoustic, Ballistic, Dust, Radiation, Thermal)
Entry, Descent, & Landing (see also Astronautics)
Passive Systems


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T8.01-9762
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Autonomous Multi-Robotic Systems
PROPOSAL TITLE: Autonomous Multi-Robot Exploration using UWB

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
TDC Acquisition Holdings, Inc.
4955 Corporate Drive, Suite 101
Huntsville, AL 35805-6208
(256) 922-9229

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Alabama, Huntsville
301 Sparkman Drive
Huntsville, AL 35805-1911
(256) 824-2659

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Brandon Dewberry
brandon.dewberry@timedomain.com
4955 Corporate Drive, Suite 101
Huntsville,  AL 35805-6208
(256) 990-8995

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Single multi-sensor teleoperated systems are not optimal for NASA exploratory missions because they limit the coverage area and scope of exploration and create a single point for mission failure. A better solution would use many robots cooperating to maximize exploration area and location accuracy while minimizing total system power and weight. The goal of this research is to investigate pulsed-RF Ultra Wideband (UWB) technology for its ability to simultaneously provide enhanced ad hoc wireless communication, distributed precision navigation/localization, and radar sensing. The ultimate goal is development of a subsumed navigation layer providing a straightforward mechanism for distributed autonomous guidance algorithms to quickly detect, share, and adapt to changes in the environment using novel distributed navigation controls. Pulsed-RF UWB supports simultaneous communications, peer-to-peer precision ranging, and multi-static radar. Using this single basis technology will enable more and smaller exploratory agents. Using UWB would solve communication and localization issues, while providing the added benefit of radar sensing and imaging. Larger spatial areas would be more accurately explored with lower power/weight/volume and with much greater system redundancy.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Development of a mobile ad hoc network with subsumed navigation layer and enabling dynamic multi-static radar for multi-robotic systems will support many non-NASA applications including: - Multi-robotic search and rescue systems working together to map and sense people in rubble - Cooperative security robots, continually mapping floor plans looking for out of place items - Autonomous chem/bio/rad hazards: small teams of robots with special sensors quickly measure and map the location of hot spots within storage warehouses - Distributed personnel and high-end asset tracking in GPS-denied industrial factories, warehouses, and construction sites - Vehicle collision avoidance safety systems for construction, mining, forestry, and other heavy industries - Formation control in autonomous agriculture

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
UWB distributed navigation and sensing technology would enhance NASA's mission in a number of ways. First, multi-robotic systems with an instrument-laden "Parent/Base" vehicle could support localization and data storage/uplink of many lightly laden "Child/Scout" vehicles. These scout vehicles would use UWB for ranging, communications, and cooperative radar, providing a small, redundant exploration architecture. Second, this concept can be extended to multiple aerial vehicles flying in tight formation using UWB peer-to-peer ranging. Simultaneous UWB multi-static radar in the outer agents would scan the surface, providing precision altimetry as well as imaging. UWB uniquely could provide precision (~100ps) dynamic time synchronization supporting distributed aperture radio arrays for long-distance transception through this swarm of cooperative agents.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Entry, Descent, & Landing (see also Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Relative Navigation (Interception, Docking, Formation Flying; see also Control & Monitoring; Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Ad-Hoc Networks (see also Sensors)
Entry, Descent, & Landing (see also Astronautics)
Ranging/Tracking
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Sensor Nodes & Webs (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T8.01-9780
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Autonomous Multi-Robotic Systems
PROPOSAL TITLE: Multi-Robot Systems for Subsurface Planetary Exploration

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Astrobotic Technology, Inc.
4551 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3524
(412) 682-3282

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3815
(412) 268-2000

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Steven Huber
steve.huber@astrobotictech.com
4551 Forbes
Pittsburgh,  PA 15213-3524
(281) 389-8171

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The proposed innovation is a heterogeneous multi-robot team developed as a platform for effective subsurface planetary exploration. State-of-art robotic exploration is based on single-robot systems with human controllers augmented by limited automation. This system requires near-constant communication and a single failure results in the end of the mission. A multi-robot system offers more efficient execution of mission tasks, such as exploration and mapping. The robotic team can re-configure in novel ways to extend range, increase mapping fidelity, or maintain a communication link. Innovative robot configurations will be developed to overcome the challenges of the subsurface environment. These challenges include power in the dark, communication to Earth, and mobility in rocky terrain. The robot team will implement state-of-art software developed at CMU to enable navigation of rough terrain, autonomous collaboration among large multi-robot groups, and sensing and navigation. Since subterranean features provide protection from surface hazards, low-cost electronics may be used to reduce mission costs. The multi-robot system provides: Parallelized exploration of large spaces or tunnel networks Autonomous task generation Autonomous reconfiguration of robot team to achieve a particular task Single robot failure does not result in end of mission

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Multi-robot operations for mapping in a subsurface void are broadly applicable to numerous terrestrial applications. Potential applications are summarized below: Following or during a natural disaster such as an earthquake or flood, multiple robot teams can be deployed to assess and respond to the situation. Sub-teams of agents perform various categories of tasks such as monitoring, inspection, search and rescue, excavation, evacuation, and distribution of aid. In mining, activities such as cutting coal, creating roof supports, and transporting coal may take place simultaneously in various locations in a mine and be performed by a combination of humans and machines (including robots). The machines responsible for each of these activities must be efficiently coordinated. In construction, activities such as excavation, earth-moving, transportation of building materials, and assembly take place simultaneously at different locations on the construction site. Again, the machines responsible for each of the activities must be efficiently coordinated.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
This program will develop technologies and capabilities that will lead to fully autonomous cooperative multi-robot systems for exploration of large rough terrain. The multi-robot team extends data gathering and mapping capability for future missions through heterogeneous capabilities and adaptive task planning. Configurations will enable optimized multi-robot application in unknown rough terrain. The specific development is a platform developed around a concept mission to explore a lunar lava tube through entering a skylight. The platform developed will be broadly applicable to similar explorations of rough and/or subsurface planetary environments, including caves, craters, cliffs, or rock fields. Additionally, low-cost robotic team members are configured to exploit operation only in the shelter of subsurface environments without the stringent requirements for survival of radiation and thermal variations at the surface; this is applicable as a strategy to reduce the cost of multi-robot mission implementations.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Recovery (see also Vehicle Health Management)
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Deployment
Machines/Mechanical Subsystems
Structures
Vehicles (see also Autonomous Systems)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T8.02-9781
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Autonomous Systems for Atmospheric Flight and Remote Sensing
PROPOSAL TITLE: High Fidelity Airborne Imaging System for Remote Observation of Space Launch/Reentry Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Opto-Knowledge Systems, Inc. (OKSI)
19805 Hamilton Avenue
Torrance, CA 90502-1341
(310) 756-0520

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
John Hopkins University / Applied Physics Lab
11100 Johns Hopkins Road Laurel
Laurel, MD 20723-6099
(240) 228-5862

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Gordon Scriven
gordon@oksi.com
19805 Hamilton Ave
Torrance,  CA 90502-1341
(310) 756-0520

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The utility of airborne remote observation of hypersonic reentry vehicles was demonstrated by the NASA Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurement (HYTHIRM) project. High spatial resolution infrared imagery was collected using available technology manned aircraft. This IR imagery was used to infer surface temperature and boundary layer transition. To increase effectiveness of the data collection, an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) platform is desired. The ideal platform would entail a "smart sensor payload" with the UAV designed around it. Developing such a system will require technological advances in several disciplines. In Phase-I system performance requirements will be established based on desired science objectives. Current state of the art technology will be utilized to define a baseline UAV and assess technology gaps and areas where technological advancement is most effective. A light weight, narrow field of view multispectral / hyperspectral imaging system a is key area of where innovative development is required. A hardware / software flight demonstration will be designed for execution during Phase-II.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
In addition to supporting NASA's next generation Space Launch System, the proposed technology could be utilized by the DoD in support of the Reusable Booster System (RBS). In addition, the light weight optical system flown on a UAV could be utilized by MDA for tracking missile enemy missile launches for extreme range to close the fire control loop.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Development of a light weight narrow field of view (NFOV) multispectral plus hyperspectral imaging system provides the ability to remotely observe hypersonic reentry vehicles. The observations can be used to accurately extract local skin temperature during peak heating, recognize anomalies, and recommend a course of action to avoid catastrophic failure. During boost phase, the spectral measurements can be used to detect the presence of metal contaminants in the exhaust plume. Metallic emission is an indication of component wear and early indication of potential engine failure.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Multispectral/Hyperspectral


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T8.03-9888
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Autonomous Navigation in GNSS-Denied Environments
PROPOSAL TITLE: Adaptive bio-inspired navigation for planetary exploration

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Neurala LLC
846 East 3rd Street
South Boston, MA 02127-2359
(510) 205-8091

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Trustees of Boston University
881 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215-1300
(617) 353-4365

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Anatoli Gorchetchnikov
anatoli@cns.bu.edu
677 Beacon St
Boston,  MA 02215-3201
(857) 928-5490

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Surface exploration of planetary environments with current robotic technologies relies heavily on human control and power-hungry active sensors to perform even the most elementary low-level functions. Ideally, a robot should be capable of autonomously exploring and interacting within an unknown environment without relying on human input or suboptimal sensors. Behaviors such as exploration of unknown environments, memorizing locations of obstacles or objects, building and updating a representation of the environment, and returning to a safe location, are all tasks that constitute typical activities efficiently performed by animals on a daily basis. Phase I of this proposal will focus on design of an adaptive robotic multi-component neural system that captures the behavior of several brain areas responsible for perceptual, cognitive, emotional, and motor behaviors. This system makes use of passive, potentially unreliable sensors (analogous to animal visual and vestibular systems) to learn while navigating unknown environments as well as build usable and correctable representations of these environments without requiring a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In Phase I, Neurala and the Boston University Neuromorphics Lab, will construct a virtual robot, or animat, to be developed and tested in an extraterrestrial virtual environment. The animat will use passive sensors to perform a spatial exploration task. The animat will start exploring from a recharging base, autonomously plan where to go based on past exploration and its current motivation, develop and correct an internal map of the environment with the locations of obstacles, select the shortest path of return to its recharging base before battery depletion, then extract the resulting explored map into a human-readable format. In Phase II Neurala will enhance and translate the model to low-power neuromorphic hardware and collaborate with iRobot to test the model in a robotics platform.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
One of the fundamental challenges of modern robotics is to build autonomous systems that are increasingly able to explore their environment and act upon choices in an intelligent way. The simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem exemplifies one such challenge. Currently, industry and academic solutions of the SLAM problem rely on accuracy of expensive sensors that are highly sensitive to noise and the complexity of real-world environments. These solutions are suboptimal since they require expensive, precise, and power-hungry sensors. The technology proposed herein mimics an animal's ability to solve the SLAM problem with noisy sensors and without the need of GNSS. Applications of this new technology include guidance systems for: - Robots navigating in GNSS-denied environment, such as collapsed building in disaster areas (e.g., earthquakes, nuclear power plants); - Robots for surveillance and scouting of indoor environments, such as urban war zones; - Microrobots for medical diagnosis, and - Robots for deep-ocean exploration.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Technology developed in this project will have a transformative impact on space exploration, and is directly relevant in supporting the key attributes of autonomy to support NASA missions, stated in the OCT roadmap for Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems (TA04) as, "the ability for complex decision making, including autonomous mission execution and planning, the ability to self-adapt as the environment in which the system is operating changes, and the ability to understand system state and react accordingly." This work addresses two space technology grand challenges which aim to enable transformational space exploration and scientific discovery: all access mobility and surviving extreme space environments. Development of a biologically-inspired, robust, low-power, multi-component brain system able to perform self-localization and mapping will enable robots to autonomously navigate novel terrains without the need of GNSS. By including the ability to learn about an environment as it explores, robotic agents will be able to autonomously negotiate novel terrains and send relevant, intelligently preprocessed information back to a human controller. Lastly, incorporating high-level decision making and conflict resolution will allow the robot to decide between exploration of its environment and returning to home base for a battery recharge.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Methods
Navigation & Guidance
Relative Navigation (Interception, Docking, Formation Flying; see also Control & Monitoring; Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Intelligence
Perception/Vision
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Command & Control
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Process Monitoring & Control
Sequencing & Scheduling
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Prototyping
Software Tools (Analysis, Design)
Data Modeling (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Data Processing
Development Environments
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T9.01-9764
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Human and Robotic Space Exploration Propulsion Design and Manufacturing
PROPOSAL TITLE: Polymer Matrix Composites using Fused Deposition Modeling Technology

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Materials Modification, Inc.
2809-K Merrilee Drive
Fairfax, VA 22031-4409
(703) 560-1371

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Texas at El Paso
500 W University Avenue
El Paso, TX 79968-0587
(915) 747-5680

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Kausik Mukhopadhyay
kausik@matmod.com
2809-K Merrilee Dr
Fairfax,  VA 22031-4409
(703) 560-1371

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing technology that allows fabrication of complex three-dimensional geometries layer-by-layer. The goal of the present proposal is to extend FDM technology to create new polymer matrix composites (PMCs) comprising of polymers and inorganic matrices. Innovative design coupled with novel PMCs can be used for cryogenic and high temperature applications. An integrated and automated process based on the FDM technology would facile large-scale manufacturing process of these PMCs. These materials can be used for making robotic components for terrestrial or extra-terrestrial applications, in aviation and defense industries, making turbine blades etc. Coupling the synthetic and cost-effective production approaches, FDM would facilitate making PMCs that can also be used for cryogenic and high temperature applications.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
(a) Aerospace and Defense (b) Medical implants (c) Construction (d) Automotive (e) Consumer goods (f) Mass transportation

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
(a) Aerospace, Aviation and UAV (b) Turbine blades and engine parts (e) Cryogenic and high temperature (f) Damage-tolerant, repairable, hydrophobic (g) Crew exploration vehicles

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Manufacturing Methods
Processing Methods
Composites
Polymers


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T9.01-9855
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Human and Robotic Space Exploration Propulsion Design and Manufacturing
PROPOSAL TITLE: Lyocell Based Carbon Carbon Composite for Use as a Large Exit Cone Material

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc.
4704 Eden Road
Kennedale, TX 76060-6800
(817) 985-2500

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Southern Research Institute
2000 Ninth Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35205-2708
(205) 581-2000

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
John Koenig
Koenig@sri.org
757 Tom Martin Dr
Birmingham,  AL 35211-4468
(205) 581-2000

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) has identified a "carbon-carbon nozzle (domestic source)" as a "Top Technical Challenge" in the 2011-2016 timeframe in the "Launch Propulsion Systems Roadmap" document. This program, by utilizing a demonstrably capable team with a deep history in the manufacture, testing, and analysis of C/C materials, will address this need by developing a Lyocell C/C composite system aimed at the need for a composite J2X nozzle extension. The proposed Lyocell based system will have the advantages of being thermally compatible with, specifically, the TEG manifold of the J2X and will have a domestic supply chain. This technology has the capability to save hundreds of pounds of weight over the current (and less capable) metal based nozzle extension. Therefore, the overall objective of this program is to develop a viable, domestically produced Lyocell based C/C that passes margin of safety requirements for use as a J2X nozzle extension material.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The potential for domestic large C/C manufacture will provide an opportunity for the currently supported commercial launch industry to utilize this technology. Though the business area is still developing, this technology has the capability to be utilized in several future commercial spacecraft. The potential also exists for DoD/MDA applications. Currently Lyocell development work is underway with MDA and US Navy support that will benefit from the research proposed in this document.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Potential NASA applications for this technology include the J2X nozzle extension, for which the application of C/C will provide hundreds of pounds of weight savings from both the material itself and the removal of a thermal expansion interface region that would have to be added with other composite systems. Other systems that would benefit are the RL-10 system family as well as the potential for use in both upper stages of heavy lift and in-space propulsion systems.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Composites
Launch Engine/Booster
Destructive Testing
Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE; NDT)
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T9.01-9966
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Human and Robotic Space Exploration Propulsion Design and Manufacturing
PROPOSAL TITLE: A Multi-disciplinary Tool for Space Launch Systems Propulsion Analysis

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
CFD Research Corporation
215 Wynn Drive, 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805-1926
(256) 726-4800

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Mississippi State University
P.O. Box 9637
Mississippi State, MS 39762-9637
(662) 325-2756

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Robert Harris
contracts-proposals@cfdrc.com
215 Wynn Drive
Huntsville,  AL 35805-1926
(256) 726-4800

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
An accurate predictive capability of coupled fluid-structure interaction in propulsion system is crucial in the development of NASA's new Space Launch System (SLS). This STTR effort will develop a multi-disciplinary tool to improve CFD prediction capability in modeling coupled fluid structure interaction (FSI) phenomena for many SLS propulsion applications such as flexible inhibitors for SRMs. During Phase I, an Application Programming Interface (API) framework with conservative interface treatment will be developed to couple a NASA production CFD solver with a DoD open source nonlinear large deformation Finite Element solver developed by the proposing firm. The multi-disciplinary tool will be rigorously validated against coupled as well as decoupled problems (fluid and structure individually). Phase I will demonstrate the improved pressure oscillation modeling fidelity and provide great insight into the physics of nonlinear FSI leading to thrust oscillations in SRMs. The Phase II effort will conduct more validations and investigations of several SLS FSI phenomena including the physics of flexible inhibitors in triggering unsteady pressure oscillations and flow induced vibration of turbine and inducer blades in liquid rocket engines.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The developed FSI analysis tool will provide accurate high-fidelity aeroelastic/hydroelastic analyses for dynamic loads analysis of turbomachinery, inducer, delivery pipe, and valves. Aerospace engineers will be able to utilize the proposed technology to analyze early designs of turbomachinery, thereby reducing the dependence on expensive wind tunnel/water tunnel and flight tests. Benefits will also be achieved in the final performance, and enhanced structural integrity, prolonged structural life, and improved safety of aerospace vehicles. Direct applications of the technology are in the analysis of dynamic loads problems of aerospace vehicles, such as buffet, flutter, buzz, and control reversal. Direct applications of the technology are also in noise, vibrations, and buffet suppression of rotorcraft and commercial air vehicles. General applications of the technology include fluid-structure interaction problems such as vortex-blade interaction of rotorcraft, trailing vortex dynamics of commercial aircraft, heat exchanger vibration, strumming of cables and offshore pipelines, galloping of towers and masts, and fatigue of panels.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
A fully coupled fluid-structure interaction tool will find a large number of applications in the SLS propulsion system including: 1. Modeling of liquid damping devices such as LOX damper performance; 2. Liquid propellant tank breathing due to liquid interaction with the flexible tank shell; 3. Fluid-structure interaction in nuclear thermal rockets; 4. Modeling of water troughs during water suppression system interactions with Ignition Over Pressure (IOP) for accurate prediction of acoustic launch environment of SLS; 5. Prediction of self-generated dynamics of fluid delivery pipes with deformable bellows; 6. Modeling of fluid-thermal-structural coupling of rocket engine nozzles; 7. Investigation of fluid-induced vibration of J-2X turbine and inducer blades; and 8. Design of new generation POGO accumulators with bellows separating liquid and gas phases

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Methods
Software Tools (Analysis, Design)
Launch Engine/Booster
Spacecraft Main Engine
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 01-9977
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Human and Robotic Space Exploration Propulsion Design and Manufacturing
PROPOSAL TITLE: Colosed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Ppart Qualification

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Keystone Synergistic Enterprises, Inc.
698 Southwest Port Saint Lucie Boulevard, Suite 105
Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953-1565
(772) 343-7544

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Mississippi State University
P.O. Box 6156
Mississippi State University, MS 39762-0000
(662) 325-7396

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Bryant Walker
bryanthwalk@aol.com
698 Southwest Port Saint Lucie Boulevard, Suite 105
Port Saint Lucie,  FL 34953-1565
(772) 343-7544

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables thereby allowing independent control of metal stirring and forging from the stir zone temperature. However, the feedback for precise control of the stir zone temperature, and hence the process parameters to sustain that temperature within a narrow range, does not currently exist on the TSW machine at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). At present, the current state of the art for the selection of process parameters for both TSWing and C-FSWing parameters is highly empirical and by nature is based on phenomenological knowledge. In response to this need, Keystone is proposing this Phase I SBIR project to demonstrate the feasibility of closed-loop control of the TSW process and to enable the establishment of a theoretically derived processing map to accelerate process understanding and selection of parameters for a given material and pin tool design. The close-loop control system will enable sustainment of a steady-state temperature at the stir rod as a function of spindle RPM and the travel velocity for a given z-axis loading and stir rod design. Use of this theoretically derived processing map will provide guidance in the optimization of the process parameter domain for solid-state welding of a given material. This capability will in turn enable rapid process qualification of the TSW process and components produced by the process.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The advancement of stir welding technologies has application well beyond NASA applications. It is envisioned this technology will become important to the Navy for ship building applications, as well as to the larger commercail ship building industry for construction of ship hulls and superstructure. The process will also be useful to fabrication of large tankage and piping for the chemical processing and transporation industry.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed technology will enable the creation of processing maps to characterize the solid-state joining of metals by thermal stir welding. The closed-loop temperature control system (applicable to other types of stir welding) will allow higher fidelity, stir welding of alloys of interest to NASA for manufacturing space craft and heavy lift vehicles. The analytical simulation of the stir welding process will enable more rapid and less costly formation of processing maps of a given material. The control system and analytical simulation combined will enable formation of a processing map for Haynes 230 (the alloy of choice by NASA for the J2X nozzsle extension) and establishment of a rapid process qualification methodology for thermal stir welded components.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Processing Methods
Joining (Adhesion, Welding)
Metallics
Launch Engine/Booster
Spacecraft Main Engine


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T10.01-9812
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Test Area Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: Intelligent Distributed and Ubiquitous Health Management System

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
American GNC Corporation
888 Easy Street
Simi Valley, CA 93065-1812
(805) 582-0582

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Louisiana Tech University
P.O. Box 3168
Ruston, LA 71272-4235
(805) 582-0582

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Ratsko Selmic
tpolito@americangnc.com
P.O. Box 3168
Ruston,  LA 71272-4235
(805) 582-0582

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
American GNC Corporation (AGNC) and Louisiana Tech University (LaTECH) are proposing a breakthrough technology consisting of an innovative system for facilitating the monitoring and management of NASA test facilities (such as rocket engine test stands) and widely distributed support systems (WDSS). This technology, termed the Intelligent Distributed and Ubiquitous Health Management System (IDU-HMS) consists of: (a) a fault aware wireless sensor network (WSN) for monitoring valves, vacuum lines, and pressurized subsystems; (b) local wireless data collection and diagnostic units; (c) a main Web service based health and data unit; and (d) portable Web clients. New and powerful algorithms based on the artificial intelligence paradigm are leveraged for conducting automated anomaly detection and diagnostics. Another key innovation is the ubiquitous information capability enabled by mobile communication technologies as well as secure Internet and wireless local area network (WLAN) connections. The architecture is based on a standardized framework for maximum modularity such that it can be integrated into current support, CBM+ type, and control systems at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC).

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
One of the main objectives of this STTR is the commercialization of the project's research results and introduction of a commercialized product into the marketplace (both civilian and military). The IDU-HMS will provide an integral solution for health monitoring and CBM applications in a variety of systems. Specific uses include: (1) heating and cooling systems in expansive commercial facilities; (2) support systems in nuclear power plants (cooling lines, gas pressurization lines, and so on) as well as other power plant types (fossil fuels, geothermal power, hydroelectric, etc.); (3) general manufacturing environments in need of FDI and CBM capabilities; (4) industrial environments that require the proper operation of fluid flow systems (e.g. refrigerant for cooling, hydraulic power systems, etc.); and (5) natural gas pipelines and other gas delivery systems.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Intelligent Distributed and Ubiquitous Health Management System will directly support health monitoring and management of NASA test facilities and widely distributed support systems. The integration of the system into NASA SSC rocket engine test stands will immediately benefit the Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) program by providing powerful FDI and wireless networking capabilities. This includes the monitoring of valves in propellant delivery systems, cooling water lines, etc. Another example is the remote monitoring of vacuum lines as part of the low pressure and low cryogenic temperature A3 test stand at NASA SSC. Possible applications outside of SSC involve the health monitoring of test facility support systems at Glen Research Center, for example, vacuum line monitoring at the zero gravity research facility, as well as usage in wind tunnel test facilities such as those at Ames Research Center and Langley Research Center.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Ad-Hoc Networks (see also Sensors)
Network Integration
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Computer System Architectures
Data Acquisition (see also Sensors)
Data Fusion
Data Processing
Knowledge Management
Sensor Nodes & Webs (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport)
Diagnostics/Prognostics


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T10.02-9782
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Energy Conservation and Sustainability
PROPOSAL TITLE: Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Sustainable Innovations, LLC
160 Oak Street
Glastonbury, CT 06033-2336
(860) 652-9690

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Connecticut
438 Whitney Road, Unit 1133
Storrs, CT 06269-1133
(860) 486-3622

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Trent Molter
trent.molter@sustainableinnov.com
160 Oak Street
Glastonbury,  CT 06033-2336
(860) 652-9690

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 2

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
NASA and many others often rely on delivery of cryogenic hydrogen to meet their facility needs. NASA's Stennis Space Center is one of the largest users of hydrogen, with the LH2 used as a fuel for cryogenic rocket engine testing. Other NASA centers including Kennedy Space Center, which utilizes hydrogen to support space shuttle launches, and many industrial locations also use significant amounts of hydrogen. Unfortunately extremely large amounts of hydrogen are lost during transfers and test operations due to boil-off resulting from heat transferred into the equipment, or by other means. Additionally, through test operations, hydrogen and helium become mixed and require separation to regain their value. This gaseous hydrogen is typically flared as a safety measure with little to no economic value or energy efficiency realized from the process. No economical means exists to safely capture, process and store, and simultaneously extract valuable energy, the large amounts of gaseous hydrogen released during NASA test operations, or in industrial applications where cryogenic hydrogen is used. The technologies developed to capture and clean the hydrogen must be cost effective and able to perform the recycling process in an in-situ rocket engine test area environment, and must comply with all safety and quality standards for this environment. Because cryogenic hydrogen is very pure, its recycle and recovery as a compressed gas can result in a valuable commodity and can provide the basis of a power generation system that conserves facility energy. This STTR project develops a Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System (HECS) that brings in gaseous hydrogen released from cryogenic storage or transfer or mixed hydrogen, helium stream from test operations, purifies the hydrogen and alternately electrochemically compresses it to commercial storage pressures (up to 6,000 psi) and reuses the hydrogen in a reaction with air to efficiently produce electricity.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System (HECS) being developed as part of this STTR can be utilized to effectively separate hydrogen from reformate streams both in commercial hydrogen production facilities and in vehicles as well as generate electric power from this hydrogen. In addition, this technology can be used to purify and compress hydrogen from most mixed streams, particularly for applications including heat treating of metals, foods processing, and semiconductor production. In addition this system can be used to produce compressed hydrogen to generate mechanical work for powering tools and other devices.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System (HECS) being developed as part of this STTR can be utilized to recover hydrogen from mixed gas streams resulting from rocket test operations and can reduce facility energy demand by efficiently generating electricity with this hydrogen. This technology can also be used to generate hydrogen for propulsion from reformed hydrocarbon fluids and alternately efficiently produce electricity for space bases and vehicles.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Essential Life Resources (Oxygen, Water, Nutrients)
Conversion
Distribution/Management
Generation
Sources (Renewable, Nonrenewable)
Storage
In Situ Manufacturing
Processing Methods
Resource Extraction
Fluids
Actuators & Motors
Atmospheric Propulsion
Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Propulsion
Fuels/Propellants
Launch Engine/Booster
Spacecraft Main Engine


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T10.02-9815
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Energy Conservation and Sustainability
PROPOSAL TITLE: Intelligent Radiative Materials

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
PC Krause and Associates, Inc.
3000 Kent Avenue, Suite C1-100
West Lafayette, IN 47906-1075
(765) 464-8997

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
The University of Texas at Austin
Office of Sponsored Projects
Austin, TX 78713-7726
(512) 471-4241

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Alex Heltzel
heltzel@pcka.com
3000 Kent Avenue, Suite C1-100
West Lafayette,  IN 47906-1075
(937) 367-9017

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
An opportunity to boost energy efficiency in homes and buildings exists through the design of functional radiative properties in glass and other building materials. Current surface materials ignore or take first-order approaches to complicated spectral behavior, leading to sub-optimal properties. The sensitivity of material properties to microscale surface structuring creates a design challenge that has precluded this technology development, however the availability of high-performance computing hardware combined with sophisticated optimization algorithms now permits the engineering of such materials. PC Krause and Associates, Inc. (PCKA) and The University of Texas (UT) will target two candidate applications with high potential for environmental and commercial impact: variable emissivity materials, and reduced emissivity glass. Both of these target applications offers independent paths to energy efficiency, along with clear routes to commercialization. Variable emissivity materials will directly reduce energy costs in diurnal climates. Likewise, the reduction of infrared emission from glass windows would address one of the costliest thermal losses in buildings of all sizes.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The target applications focus primarily on materials that will reduce HVAC requirements in homes and buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that approximately 70% of the electricity generated in the US is through fossil fuel combustion, which in turn accounts for approximately 40% of emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases. The potential to reduce this reliance represents a large reduction in costs associated with heating and air conditioning, but also a reduction in environmental pollutants. Based on past success, it is estimated that this SBIR Program will result in annual licensable technology of value greater than $1M, and the addition of full-time staff at PCKA to support thermal management research.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Materials engineered for intelligent radiative behavior will directly affect the energy consumption required by large industrial facilities and campuses. The sustainability of NASA facilities will be improved by the installation of window glass and variable emissivity building materials developed as a result of the proposed work. The ability to design passive variable emissivity materials also has direct application in spacecraft thermal management, where thermal radiation can represent the only mode of heat transfer to and from the craft.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Distribution/Management
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Microfabrication (and smaller; see also Electronics; Mechanical Systems; Photonics)
Nanomaterials
Smart/Multifunctional Materials
Passive Systems


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-1 T10.02-9974
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Energy Conservation and Sustainability
PROPOSAL TITLE: Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Innovative Imaging and Research
Building 1103, Suite 140C
Stennis Space Center, MS 39529-0001
(228) 688-2452

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
The University of Southern Mississippi
118 College Drive #5157
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001
(601) 266-4119

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Robert Ryan
rryan@i2rcorp.com
Building 1103, Suite 140C
Stennis Space Center,  MS 39529-0001
(228) 688-2276

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Innovative Imaging and Research has teamed with the University of Southern Mississippi to develop a novel energy efficient smart light system. Smart lighting adds an occupancy sensor, photosensor, controller, and dimming unit to a light source and has been shown to save up to 50% of the energy required to power traditional lighting in existing buildings and up to 35% in new construction. Our novel system has the potential to further increase energy savings and enable new functionality never before incorporated into a light fixture. Our concept turns a commonly available low cost digital camera into an imaging photosensor using calibration techniques developed for NASA and the remote sensing industry. Our concept also takes advantage of the current mobile device technology boom by using mobile devices to both monitor and process control software within the smart light. Monitoring natural light that may be present, due to a window or skylight is key to our smart light, as our system spatially and temporally adjusts the light it produces when natural light conditions change&#150; a sustainable energy concept known as daylight harvesting. While we will initially work with white light LEDs, our concept accommodates multi-color LEDs that mix to generate white light. Our smart light will therefore be able to spectrally match the natural light found within a room by controlling each color LED separately. Tailoring light spectrums affects biochemical processes and has been shown to improve sleep patterns and academic attention. By working with mobile devices we can reduce privacy concerns and process imagery within the light sensor without recording or transmitting information. It may be desirable however to add that capability as it would enable a host of other safety functions such as general security, and fire detection.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
After a successful Phase II project, Innovative Imaging and Research will be in a position to provide this energy-efficient smart light technology to non-NASA commercial entities that are interested with providing quality lighting while lowering energy consumption. We believe our technology will have significant appeal within the education sector. Throughout the country more and more school districts are incorporating "green school" concepts. The Green Schools Initiative incorporates a 4-pillared framework that includes energy efficiency and using recourses sustainably. We plan to engage with these programs and initiatives to showcase our unique technology, which is highly applicable to educational environments. Our smart light technology not only reduces the overall amount of energy consumed through efficient light harvesting-producing light only when and where it is needed, but is also capable of tailoring the spectrum of the light it produces to affect natural biorhythms, which has been shown to improve academic attention. Other potential markets include libraries, museums and other public places that would benefit from security monitoring and fire protection monitoring, additional features that our smart light system will provide. We believe that this technology will initially be too expensive for general household consumers, but as markets expand and LED and other component prices continue to decrease, this technology can be marketed to the general public.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
After a successful Phase II project, Innovative Imaging and Research will be in a position to provide this energy-efficient smart light technology to NASA and other Federal government agencies concerned with providing quality lighting while lowering energy consumption. United States Executive Order 13423, issued in January 2007, mandates that federal buildings reduce their energy use by 3 percent per year, so that they attain a 30 percent reduction in energy use by the year 2015. To enter this market, we will work to establish business relationships with commercial entities, such as Cisco Systems, that provide energy management solutions to Federal government customers. We also plan to approach NASA field office Center Operations offices directly to offer near-term consultation services to identify lighting solutions with the greatest energy saving potential. In general these will be NASA office and laboratory environments with partial solar illumination, that take advantage of the daylight harvesting feature of our smart light concept, and locations within NASA facilities that are intermittently populated such as stairwells and bathrooms, that take advantage of the occupancy sensing technology within our smart light concept. We also anticipate large payoff for NASA adopting this technology in areas that would benefit from security monitoring and fire protection monitoring, additional features that our smart light system will provide.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Data Acquisition (see also Sensors)
Data Processing
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Radiometric
Visible