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NASA 2014 SBIR Select Phase II Solicitation


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 A20.01-8906
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CL83P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Air Traffic Management Research and Development
PROPOSAL TITLE: Air Traffic Management Cost Assessment Tool

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Robust Analytics
2053 Liza Way
Gambrills, MD 21054-2007
(410) 980-3667

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Peter Kostiuk
peter.kostiuk@robust-analytics.com
2053 Liza Way
Gambrills,  MD 21054-2007
(410) 980-3667

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The Robust Analytics Air Traffic Management Cost Assessment Tool (ACAT) provides the comprehensive capability to analyze the impacts of NASA air traffic management (ATM) research from individual flight trajectories through airline network operations and airline investments in equipment and training. Our air traffic management cost and economic model offers researchers and project managers a greater understanding of the cost drivers for aircraft operators and helps to validate the cost and revenue impacts of AOSP research. Increased validity of predicted results will help AOSP continue to receive operator support and hasten the transition of ARMD technologies into the NAS. Our model generates cost-benefit estimates for concept and procedure alternatives for individual airlines. The model also estimates a variety of impacts on industry, including input utilization and productivity, throughput, air transportation industry costs and fares, and broader economic effects such as employment and benefits to other industries. The ACAT goes beyond simple flight cost factors by providing greater fidelity in the cost analysis of flight segments, explicit estimation of training and certification cost, and realistic treatment of deployment time and risk. Our cost analysis is performed using airline-specific data, enabling more realistic assessment of airline investment decisions and identification of disparate effects and willingness to invest among airlines. ACAT can improve airline cost-benefit analyses to estimate the profitability of new and existing service on an ongoing basis, as well as investment in advanced ATM capabilities. The model will operate as a stand-alone tool and can integrate with airline flight planning and tracking systems. The model uses publicly available data that can be updated quarterly.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
All airlines require analytical tools and data to estimate the profitability of new and existing service on an ongoing basis. Offering a comprehensive cost modeling tool that improves the ability of its airline customers to plan and operate scheduled flights would be valuable. We have had discussions on airline cost-benefit analyses with current and former flight profitability managers at United and Continental. Those discussions indicated that even these sophisticated airlines had to conduct cost assessments of new procedures on an ad hoc basis and could benefit from access to a good cost model. For instance, United conducted assessments of the new curved approach procedures into SFO and calculated the relative costs of the baseline and new procedure cases. This analysis could have been conducted much faster and more effectively with our proposed cost model combined with simulation capabilities provided by FACET and ACES. The ACAT will operate as a stand-alone tool coupled with professional analytical services and can be into airline flight planning and analysis systems. The mechanism for providing this improved capability will be through airline flight operations center planning and operational software. Many NextGen and Airspace Systems tools rely on airline FOCs to manage flights, trajectory planning, and re-routing. We envision the cost model as an added capability to AOCs to assist in evaluating the impact of airline investments in ATM and NextGen capabilities.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
1. Provide NASA system analysts with a comprehensive cost and airline revenue model to conduct trade studies and portfolio assessments. By integrating with ACES and FACET, the models of choice for system analyses, would provide more credible results and reduce the cost and effort to conduct studies. 2. Provide a much-needed analytical tool to estimate the total system operating cost for the current baseline or under the advanced concepts and architectures in ARMD's research portfolio. The Strategy, Architecture, and Analysis organization in ARMD does not currently have any model or analytical tool that can estimate the total system operating cost for the current baseline or under the advanced concepts and architectures in ARMD's research portfolio. Neither do the Centers or AOSP. 3. Meet the requirements for a total system cost model for the Airspace Systems Shadow Mode Assessment for Realistic Technologies in the National Airspace System (SMART NAS) project. Our cost model solution aims to meet the requirements of SMART NAS while simultaneously providing the much-needed cost estimating and airline benefit capability to support ATM investment analyses. 4. Support AOSP trade studies and provide useful feedback to researchers on likely operator acceptance based on realistic return on investment estimates, assessment of risks and deployment timelines, and financial constraints.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Air Transportation & Safety
Analytical Methods
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 A20.01-9145
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CA55P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Air Traffic Management Research and Development
PROPOSAL TITLE: Integration of Tactical Departure Scheduling and Traffic Flow Management

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Mosaic ATM, Inc.
540 Ft. Evans Road, Northeast, Suite 300
Leesburg, VA 20176-4098
(800) 405-8576

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Chris Brinton
brinton@mosaicatm.com
540 Fort Evans Road, Suite 300
Leesburg,  VA 20176-4098
(703) 980-3961

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
NASA's Air Traffic Management (ATM) research has produced many important, advanced decision support tools (DSTs) over the past three decades. A key challenge in the design and use of ATM DSTs is to determine how much control should be applied to the flow of traffic and at what point in the flow the control should be applied. This question can be addressed both during the initial operational ATM planning process, as well as during dynamic operations re-planning. This challenge has significant impact on the resulting effectiveness of any ATM control program that is applied, because inefficiencies can be caused by either under or over-control of the flow. Unfortunately, comprehensive DSTs don't exist for many ATM decisions that must be made, and most DSTs that do exist do not provide any guidance regarding when the control should be applied, nor do they quantify the potential risk associated with the timing of control application. An integrated decision support capability is needed to provide ATM specialists and flight operators with information to support planning and decision-making about tactical and strategic TMIs. The significant challenge that exists in providing this decision support capability is the uncertainty of prediction of both demand and capacity. The work that has been conducted in this Phase I SBIR effort, and that is proposed for continuation in Phase II, addresses this fundamental research need in ATM automation system design in the context of the integration of Tactical Departure Scheduling (TDS) with Traffic Flow Management (TFM). During Phase I, we designed, tested and conducted initial validation on mathematical and simulation models that characterize and quantify the relationship between IADS capabilities and other TMIs. These models provide guidance and input for further NASA research efforts and activities, and they will also provide real-time operational decision support for Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs) and other ATC specialists.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The NAS Flow Constraint Monitor concept described in this proposal can provide valuable information for airlines and other flight operators about the potential constraints and congestion that flights will experience in the NAS based on traffic management initiatives. Flight operators can then use this information to plan for potential delays or reroutes and their effect on their overall network of flight operations. Advance notice of potential delays can aid dispatchers in planning what routes to file, which alternative arrival airports to utilize, and how much fuel to load on the aircraft. Within this Phase II proposal, we have included a license application to use the Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET), which is NASA Intellectual Property. Our commercialization approach leverages FACET as a platform for providing situational awareness and planning capabilities for airlines. Multiple airline customers that have adopted technology that originated from NASA have selected Mosaic to provide contract-funded support for these technologies. Thus, Mosaic ATM is in an excellent position to continue to commercialize NASA technologies through a licensing agreement as described in the proposal.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
As this innovative concept is directly related to the air transportation system, the most appropriate application of the concept and prototype will be further research on ATM operational improvements. This concept for the integration of strategic and tactical Traffic Management Initiatives can be applied by NASA across many concepts and technologies to enhance their integration within the Traffic Flow Management procedures and tools in the National Airspace System. Mosaic ATM has provided significant support on numerous projects in the successful transfer of NASA research into the operational inventory of the FAA. Our approach to this technology transfer is to provide support for the transfer process, but to remain within the direction of NASA and the FAA at all times. Using this approach, the research is properly recognized as NASA technology, and the FAA receives in-depth support from an organization that already knows the details of the technology.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Air Transportation & Safety
Analytical Methods
Command & Control
Sequencing & Scheduling
Data Modeling (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Data Processing
Transport/Traffic Control


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 H20.01-8788
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CA56P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Human-Robotic Systems - Manipulation Subsystem and Human-System Interaction
PROPOSAL TITLE: Pneubotics - Membrane-Based Robotics for Remote Material Handling

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Otherlab, Inc.
3101 20th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110-2714
(415) 970-2209

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Kevin Albert
kalbert@otherlab.com
3101 20th Street
San Francisco,  CA 94110-2714
(617) 372-6915

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
We have invented a new class of robotics, called `Pneubotics', that rival current manipulators in payload and reach at 1/10th the weight. Our technology leverages insights into lightweight materials and mass manufacturing to create robots that derive power, structure, and movement from pressurized air. As a result, drive trains, motors, bearings, shafts, sliding surfaces, and excess structural material are eliminated, leading to robots with extremely high strength to weight ratios, inherently human safe operation, and high degrees of freedom at low part count. This transformative new technology has the potential to enable the widespread use of automated handling of material and equipment on missions in low Earth orbit and beyond. The compliant nature of these robotic systems allows them to robustly grasp arbitrarily shaped objects and makes them ideal for operating around sensitive equipment and materials or cooperatively with humans. Similarly, due to their fluidic architecture they can be deflated and stowed for efficient transport. The work described in this phase II SBIR proposal would integrate the component development and analysis performed in Phase I to build and test a full prototype manipulation system. By incorporating optical, internal, and tactile sensors and multi-level controls that take advantage of the unique characteristics of the manipulator and seek out appropriate contact to guide motion rather than avoiding it. By testing the entire prototype system in the field we will demonstrate operation in the ground environment and learn valuable lessons for IVA and EVA applications.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Due to the low weight and price point of Pneubotic technology, high performance manipulators with the strength of industrial arms become available to mobile applications. The commercial potential of such a product is immense and has applications in a wide range of markets including manufacturing, agriculture, military, commercial, and consumer. We are targeting an untapped sector of the global material handling market that we are calling "mobile material handling." This market includes tasks that take place outside the confines of a structured industrial cell where objects between 10kg - 30kg need to be moved short distances. Distribution centers, fulfillment centers, package delivery, and baggage centers are all potential customers. Traditionally, these applications have resisted robotics due to their high cost, weight, lack of mobility, and need for safety cages. Pneubotics can uniquely address the challenges presented by mobile material handling and offer a product that replaces pallet jacks and hand trucks with safe, human-controlled machine systems.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Pneubotic systems offer robust grasping, human safe operation, and efficient transportation, vital qualities for robotic manipulators that are part of NASA missions. This unique technology enables a diverse set of applications at several scales, including on-orbit astronaut support, tele-operated servicing and operations, manipulation of the local environment by extra-terrestrial rovers, and even safe capture systems at the large scale. The lightweight, fully compliant structure alleviates concerns about errant motion during interactions with humans while the use of fabric manufacturing techniques allows for the construction of complex shapes and light systems that pack small.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Man-Machine Interaction
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Teleoperation
Actuators & Motors
Machines/Mechanical Subsystems
Pressure & Vacuum Systems
Structures


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 H20.01-9235
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CJ38P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Human-Robotic Systems - Manipulation Subsystem and Human-System Interaction
PROPOSAL TITLE: Context-Augmented Robotic Interaction Layer (CARIL) Phase II

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
CHI Systems, Inc.
2250 Hickory Road, Suite 150
Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462-1047
(215) 542-1400

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Wayne Zachary
wzachary@chisystems.com
2250 Hickory Road
Plymouth Meeting,  PA 19462-1047
(215) 542-1400

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
CHI Systems and the Institute for Human Machine Cognition have teamed to create a human-robot interaction system that leverages cognitive representations of shared context as a basis for a fundamentally new approach to human-robotic interaction. This approach centers on a framework for representing context, and for using context to enable robot adaptive decision-making and behavior. The framework is called CARIL (the Context-Augmented Robotic Interaction Layer). Context is an important part of human-human interaction. Unfortunately, context is often overlooked when designing robotic systems. The challenge is to translate high-level concepts, such as teamwork and collaboration, into specific requirements that can be implemented within control algorithms, interface elements, and behaviors. During Phase I, CHI Systems developed a proof-of-concept CARIL implementation and applied it to a notional simulated robot in a simple station model. This simulation demonstrated CARIL's feasibility by demonstrating how it gave the simulated robot a capability to reason about its context to avoid spatial interference with astronaut activities and tasks.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Military Robot and Uninhabited Robot Vehicles (URV) Markets – provide increased robotic autonomy and enhanced human-robotic control to military URV applications. Civil/Commercial Robot and Uninhabited Robot Vehicles (URV) Markets – provide increased human-robot collaboration and adaptive behaviors to business whose future strategy relies on the use of robots and drones to optimize manufacturing, supply-chain and distribution processes.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
CARIL allows a robot to have "action compliance" – an ability to adapt its behavior to that of human astronauts around it, by using a human-like model of context. Action Compliance, the behavioral analog of physical-interaction force compliance concept, is an enabling capability. Its post-applications are to the Robonaut-2 program at Johnson Space Center, the Free-flying robot (SPHERES) program at Ames Research Center, and as an embeddable, enabling technology, to all future robotic or robotic programs or future missions requiring robots or robotic vehicles.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Avionics (see also Control and Monitoring)
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Intelligence
Man-Machine Interaction
Perception/Vision
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 H20.02-9027
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CC98P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: International Space Station (ISS) Demonstration and Development of Improved Exploration Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator for Life Support and Thermal Control Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Creare, Inc.
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755-3116
(603) 643-3800

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Michael Izenson
mgi@creare.com
P.O. Box 71
Hanover,  NH 03755-3116
(603) 643-3800

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 5
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Future human space exploration missions will require advanced life support technology that can operate across a wide range of applications and environments. Thermal control systems for space suits and spacecraft will need to meet critical requirements for water conservation and adaptability to highly variable thermal environments. To achieve these goals, we propose an International Space Station (ISS) demonstration program for an innovative Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) technology. A SEAR system comprises a lithium chloride absorber radiator (LCAR) for heat rejection coupled with a space water membrane evaporator (SWME) for heat acquisition. SEAR systems provide heat pumping to minimize radiator size, thermal storage to accommodate variable environmental conditions, and water absorption to minimize use of expendables. In Phase I we proved the feasibility of our approach by building and testing an LCAR with flight-like internal structures and designing an ISS demonstration experiment. In Phase II we will design and build SEAR components, a flight-like test module, and a regeneration system according to ISS flight requirements. We will demonstrate their operation in ground tests that simulate flight test conditions.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Technology developed under this program can be used for commercial dehumidification systems, particularly heat-driven systems in which desiccant/enthalpy wheels are used to transfer water vapor between air streams. The lithium-chloride containment and management technology developed for the SEAR can be applied to make these systems more compact and efficient. SEAR technology can also benefit microclimate cooling systems for industrial, medical, military, and recreational purposes. Absorption cooling can enable lightweight, low-power, man-portable refrigeration systems that can remove both heat and humidity from fully enclosed protective garments.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
There are two primary NASA applications for the SEAR technology. (1) Nonventing thermal control systems for space suits. A SEAR-based thermal control system rejects heat by radiation instead of venting water vapor. The advanced LCAR design we demonstrate in this program can provide a multifunctional structure and double as the shell that houses the portable life support system; and (2) Nonventing thermal control and thermal storage system for manned spacecraft. A SEAR-based thermal control system can be attractive for lunar orbiters and other spacecraft that will operate in highly variable thermal environments. A SEAR can provide high-efficiency thermal energy storage and heat rejection that vents no water. Both SEAR applications are based on the same LCAR module technology that we will demonstrate in Phase II.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Protective Clothing/Space Suits/Breathing Apparatus
Active Systems


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 S20.01-8853
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CP64P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Array Technologies for Microwave Remote Sensing
PROPOSAL TITLE: Ku/Ka-Band Electrically-Scanned Line Array for Tri-Band Cloud and Precipitation Radar Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Nuvotronics, LLC
7586 Old Peppers Ferry Loop
Radford, VA 24141-8846
(800) 341-2333

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Benjamin Cannon
contracts@nuvotronics.com
2305 Presidential Drive
Durham,  NC 27703-8074
(800) 341-2333

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
This proposed program addresses the need for a spaceborne phased array radar system that operates simultaneously at multiple frequency bands for future NASA remote sensing missions dedicated to answering emerging fundamental questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and ecosystems. We will deliver active, electronically scanned array tiles at Ku- and Ka-band utilizing the Nuvotronics PolyStrata® technology for integration alongside an electronically scanned W-band array to form a tri-band system. The PolyStrata® wafer-scale microfabrication process, with capabilities to monolithically integrate dielectric-free antennas with air-coax feed networks in 3D, is a key enabler for achieving state-of-the art performance requirements and manufacturing scalability. Unprecedented power levels will be achieved by integrating state-of-the art GaN MMICs into the PolyStrata front-end architecture.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Military applications: microwave and millimeter-wave active electronically scanned radar systems for rotorcraft landing in degraded visual environment (e.g. brown-out conditions); guided missile seekers; non-lethal active denial directive energy systems; unmanned aerial system collision avoidance.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed solution applies to future Earth science remote sensing missions including: Tri-band cloud and precipitation radar systems for Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) mission and the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CaPPM) for vision beyond GPM; and the Snow and Cold Land Processes (SCLP) mission. Additionally, this technology has applications in planetary landing radars such as what is used for the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Microfabrication (and smaller; see also Electronics; Mechanical Systems; Photonics)
Electromagnetic
Microwave


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 S20.01-9951
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CP62P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Array Technologies for Microwave Remote Sensing
PROPOSAL TITLE: Low Power Digital Correlator System for PATH Mission

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Pacific Microchip Corporation
3916 Sepulveda Boulevard, #108
Culver City, CA 90230-4650
(310) 683-2628

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Denis Zelenin
denis@pacificmicrochip.com
3916 Sepulveda Blvd. #108
Culver City,  CA 90230-4650
(310) 683-2628

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 7

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The NASA's PATH mission employs GeoSTAR spectral radiometer processing data from antenna consisting of three arms, each holding 128 microwave receivers. Each of the 384 receivers amplifies RF signals, and down-converts them to an intermediate frequency (IF). As a result, 768 in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signals are produced with a frequency of 10 to 500MHz. The IF signals have to be normalized and digitized with 1Gs/s sampling rate for further cross-correlation. Each signal from one arm of the receiver must be cross-correlated with all signals from the other two arms, therefore a system containing 196,000 parallel cross-correlation blocks is needed. Since the GeoSTAR is a space born instrument, low power dissipation and ensuring system reliability, through processing redundancy, are one of the most important requirements. A system assembled by using off-the-shelf components would be extremely power inefficient, bulky, and unreliable. Therefore, a system that is based on application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) is required. While working on the NASA's SBIR Phase II project "Low Power Cross-Correlator ASIC" (NNX13CP01C), Pacific Microchip Corp. has developed and fabricated an ASIC that includes 128-element array of 2-bit 1GS/s ADCs, and 4096 parallel cross-correlation cells. The ASIC was designed based on the GeoSTAR radiometer requirements, therefore it is intended to be the key component in the cross-correlator system which is being developed. The system will contain means correlation results further post-processing and control of ASICs.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
-Radiometry, interferometry and spectrometry for remote sensing -Image sensor signal processing -Synthetic aperture radars used in both military and civil aviation -Future sensor networks

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
-Synthetic aperture radiometer used for the PATH mission -Space and land based radiometer and interferometer instruments

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Data Input/Output Devices (Displays, Storage)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 S20.03-9947
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CG51P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Radiation Hardened Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) Platforms
PROPOSAL TITLE: Radiation Hardened Structured ASIC Platform for Rapid Chip Development for Very High Speed System on a Chip (SoC) and Complex Digital Logic Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Microelectronics Research Development Corporation
4775 Centennial Boulevard, Suite 130
Colorado Springs, CO 80919-3332
(719) 531-0805

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Sasan Ardalan
sasan.ardalan@micro-rdc.com
2100 Airpark SE, Suite 120
Albuquerque,  NM 87106-3227
(505) 294-1962

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Radiation Hardened Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) provide the highest performance, lowest power and smallest size ICs for Space Missions. To dramatically reduce the development cycle, and reduce cost to tape out, Micro-RDC proposes a Structured ASIC approach. In this methodology, we fix an array of complex logic cells and provide a fixed area array for I/O pads supporting in excess of 400 Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) General Purposes Input/Output (GPIO) pins. In addition, we fix the power grid and the pins associated with power (core and I/O) and ground. Thus, we require only routing in a subset of the metal layers to configure the Structured ASIC for a specific design. This leads to substantial reduction in design and verification time to tape out. Costs are reduced by requiring a subset of mask changes per design. In this work, we will build on Micro-RDC's existing 90nm silicon-proven Radiation Hardened Structured ASIC platform. We will develop a Structured ASIC platform at the 45nm SOI technology node. The objective is to increase clock speeds to hundreds of MHz. Single Event Upset (SEU) immunity is achieved in the sequential logic using Temporal Latch® Technology. We will provide turnkey Register Transfer Language (RTL) to GDSII capability for Radiation Hardened ASICs.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Commercial companies that deploy geosynchronous satellites will benefit from the capability to design Radiation Hardened ASICs that can be configured in a rapid production cycle to meet specific demands for interfacing to communication systems over high band width busses. The dramatic cost reduction with Structured ASIC will make possible missions that required ASICs but were cost prohibitive. The Rad Hard Structured ASIC approach will also allow commercial CubeSat missions to extend beyond low Earth orbit to interplanetary missions that require greater Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and SEU immunity. Also commercial missions with high cost payloads can plan longer term low Earth orbit missions using Rad Hard, high performance, low cost ASICs in place of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) parts that will fail.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
With the rapid development cycle to manufacture packaged Radiation Hardened ASIC chips with the increased speed performance and dramatically lower power, NASA can enable interplanetary and long term low Earth orbit missions that support 32 bit and 64 bit System on a Chip (SoC) with high speed networking and multiple sensor bus support. These SoC ASICs will enable more complex sensor integration with Command and Data Handling (C&DH). Designs can be adapted to various bus protocols proposed and in use for CubeSat missions. The reconfigurable high gate count, multi-MHz SEU immune sequential logic, embedded RAM and mask programmable Read Only Memory (ROM) capability, allows for high performance processors to be designed to meet mission requirements in rapid production cycles with proven in silicon fabric and standard die I/O and robust high pin count packaging. The anticipated six month to silicon cycle will allow NASA the ability to meet mission schedules without sacrificing speed and power requirements and will also enable missions that were otherwise impossible to achieve in harsh radiation environments.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Navigation & Guidance
Spacecraft Instrumentation & Astrionics (see also Communications; Control & Monitoring; Information Systems)
Command & Control
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Manufacturing Methods
Prototyping
Software Tools (Analysis, Design)
Computer System Architectures
Data Acquisition (see also Sensors)
Data Processing


PROPOSAL NUMBER:14-2 Z20.01-9956
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX14CM39P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Deep Space Cubesat Technology
PROPOSAL TITLE: 1U CubeSat Lasercom Terminal for Deep Space Communication

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Fibertek, Inc.
13605 Dulles Technology Drive
Herndon, VA 20171-4603
(703) 471-7671

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Shantanu Gupta
sgupta@fibertek.com
13605 Dulles Technology Drive
Herndon,  VA 20171-4603
(703) 471-7671

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
In this NASA SBIR-select Phase 2 program Fibertek will develop, test and validate a high-fidelity 1U CubeSat Lasercom Optical Terminal prototype, optimized for deep-space optical communication, and targeting the following characteristics &#150; (i) Low Size/Weight/Power (SWaP) 1U Lasercom Terminal for deep-space mission (total power budget P<10W is targeted), (ii) Athermalized optical design of a fiber-coupled laser transmitter to innovative optical telescope for lasercom transmit/receive function, (iii) quasi-monolithic design and fabrication of the optical assembly with large 65 mm aperture, (iv) integrated beam point-ahead and beam-pointing stabilization capability, (v) integrated radiation-tolerant controller card for all control and interface functions for this 1U CubeSat terminal, (vi) Low power radiation-tolerant FPGA based electronics design, for a reconfigurable and highly capable processing platform, and (vii) compatible with a CubeSat bus interface with the appropriate ADCS system. The prototype optical terminal will be tested and characterized in a lab environment, for optical signal sensitivity levels, acquisition field-of-view requirements, and very low jitter pointing stabilization, representative of the requirements for deep-space optical communication link.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
(1) Compact, efficient LEO-GEO space lasercom optical terminal for DoD applications, e.g. AF, NRO (2) Compact, efficient lasercom optical terminal for UAV to satellite applications (3) Can be adapted for any optical terminal (Transmit/Receive) needs for a SmallSat platform on hosted payloads.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
(1) 1U CubeSat lasercom optical terminal for deep-space and inter-planetary missions (2) Compact, efficient space lasercom optical terminal for LEO/GEO platforms (3) Optical terminal design can be adapted for active remote-sensing of planetary atmospheres. (4) Optical terminal can be used for lidar based entry-descent & landing, as all needed functionalities - laser transmit/receive, processing, and optical telescope are already available (5) Compact and cost-effective optical terminal for potential imaging applications from CubeSat or SmallSat platforms

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Entry, Descent, & Landing (see also Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Spacecraft Instrumentation & Astrionics (see also Communications; Control & Monitoring; Information Systems)
Transmitters/Receivers
Fiber (see also Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Photonics)
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Lasers (Communication)
Optical