NASA SBIR 2020-I Solicitation

Proposal Summary


PROPOSAL NUMBER:
 20-1- Z10.01-4597
SUBTOPIC TITLE:
 Cryogenic Fluid Management
PROPOSAL TITLE:
 DynaSwirl® Phase Separator for Cryogenic Liquid/Vapor Separation
SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dynaflow, Inc.
10621-J Iron Bridge Road
Jessup, MD 20794
(301) 604-3688

Principal Investigator (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)

Name:
Georges Chahine
E-mail:
glchahine@dynaflow-inc.com
Address:
10621-J Iron Bridge Rd. Jessup, MD 20794 - 9381
Phone:
(301) 604-3688

Business Official (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)

Name:
Georges Chahine
E-mail:
glchahine@dynaflow-inc.com
Address:
10621-J Iron Bridge Rd. Jessup, MD 20794 - 9381
Phone:
(301) 604-3688
Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) :
Begin: 1
End: 1
Technical Abstract (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)

As NASA prepares to make manned missions into deep space, the management of cryogenic fluids will become increasingly important. Cryogenic fluids such as liquefied hydrogen, oxygen, and methane are expected to be used for chemical and nuclear propulsion, fuel cells, life support systems, cooling, refrigeration, liquefaction, and In-Situ Resource Utilization. Transfer of stored cryogenic liquids from a supply tank to an empty tank will be an important procedure during which phase change will occur.  In addition, temperature fluctuations during long term storage of cryogenic fluids can result in the vaporization of these liquids.  In low gravity conditions, buoyancy forces will be insufficient to separate the vapors formed from the liquids and  the presence of vapor in the liquid streams will interfere with combustion in engines, and pumps, resulting in equipment damage.

In this Phase I SBIR project, we propose to demonstrate the feasibility of using a specially designed chamber to separate the vapor from the cryogenic liquid. This separator will use swirl to generate centripetal forces to force vapor out of the liquid into the central core of the vortex. The lighter vapor bubbles will separate  from the cryogenic liquid to form a stable core in the center of the chamber surrounded by the liquid. The vapor can then be pumped from the system and collected for further use. The design will prevent the vaporous core from reaching the liquid exit. The liquid stream will flow out of the other end of the chamber where it can be stored or transferred.

This approach is based on our previous separator designs for removing air from water under microgravity. The resulting technology has been tested under microgravity conditions. Based on those results the application of a similar design to cryogenic fluid management is predicted to succeed.

Potential NASA Applications (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)

Numerous NASA applications to be used for longterm space habitation and manned missions into deep space will require cryogenic fluids management. These include the storage and transfer of cryogenic fluids for chemical and nuclear based propulsors, life support systems formation and recovery of fluids generated in situ, etc. Longterm storage of cryogenic fluids may subject the stored fluids to boil off. Therefore, cryogenic phase separation is needed to protect pumps and equipment from bubbly flows in low gravity conditions.

 

 

Potential Non-NASA Applications (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)

The separation of vapor phases in cryogenic fluids is applicable in Magnetic Resonance Imaging equipment, superconductors, supercomputers and cryopreservation of biological samples liquefaction of natural gas and cryopreservation of pathology and biological samples. This technology could also be used in hospitals and medical research centers, as well as Department of Defense missile programs.

 

 

Duration: 6

Form Generated on 06/29/2020 21:11:42