NASA SBIR 2020-I Solicitation

Proposal Summary


PROPOSAL NUMBER:
 20-1- S5.04-5117
SUBTOPIC TITLE:
 Integrated Science Mission Modeling
PROPOSAL TITLE:
 Advanced Science Modeling for Mission Planning & Analysis
SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Ascending Node Technologies, LLC
2548 East 4th Street
Tucson, AZ 85716
(520) 314-5595

Principal Investigator (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)

Name:
Sanford Selznick
E-mail:
sanford-sbir@ascendingnode.tech
Address:
2548 E. 4th Street Tucson, AZ 85716 - 4416
Phone:
(520) 314-5595

Business Official (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)

Name:
Sanford Selznick
E-mail:
sanford-sbir@ascendingnode.tech
Address:
2548 E. 4th Street Tucson, AZ 85716 - 4416
Phone:
(520) 314-5595
Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) :
Begin: 3
End: 4
Technical Abstract (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)

Simulating science objectives is an essential component of NASA missions to reduce risk. As technology has improved, so has the fidelity, complexity, and precision of scientific instrumentation. In addition, the communications bandwidth of the modern spacecraft allows for the transmission of more data than ever. These increased capabilities have placed extra demands on science data generation. Simulated science data for use in planning are required for a successful mission, not only in flight, but through all stages of mission planning as well.  Unprecedented collaboration between science and operations teams require large swaths of cumbersome technology for sharing, integrating, and visualizing simulated data. This significant complexity hinders the ability of responsible parties to make informed, sensible, and rapid decisions.

 

Spaceline is a server- and web-based application developed under a previous NASA SBIR Phase I contract. The Spaceline application consists of three core capabilities: SPICE kernel management, 3D interactive display of a scene, and simulation of science data for any onboard instrument for a given instant in time. We propose to extend this core functionality further by extending Spaceline’s features from supporting just visible wavelength imagers to supporting a wide range of different sensors that would interact with a variety of different target models. Each target model in turn represents different scientific phenomena ranging from planetary interiors to magnetic fields to the emission of volatiles and particles. We will investigate how to best support exoplanet surveys with Spaceline and what features can be added to effectively simplify the considerations necessary for users who are designing sensors for exoplanet surveys as well as those who are planning and operating such missions.

Potential NASA Applications (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)

This work will be a welcome addition to any NASA mission looking to reduce costs and risks involved with science planning. Users will have access to an environment in which they can analyze and measure the impact of proposed observation plans against complex scientific phenomena. This work will facilitate NASA in their goal of developing Mission Design Analysis tools to increase the accuracy of science modeling and enable design of future observing systems by predicting and optimizing their impacts on science data collection.

Potential Non-NASA Applications (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)

The expansion of Spaceline to support planetary and astronomical models across wavelengths and phenomena would also facilitate mission planning for commercial Earth-orbiting constellations and Space Domain Awareness. Spaceline can also be used in science classes, allowing students to freely explore different data models for a planet, even adding their own models created from source data.

Duration: 6

Form Generated on 06/29/2020 21:08:30