NASA SBIR 2020-I Solicitation

Proposal Summary


PROPOSAL NUMBER:
 20-1- A1.01-4698
SUBTOPIC TITLE:
 Aeroelasticity and Aeroservoelastic Control
PROPOSAL TITLE:
 Generation of CFD-Based Structurally Independent Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix
SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
ZONA Technology, Inc.
9489 East Ironwood Square Drive
Scottsdale, AZ 85258
(480) 945-9988

Principal Investigator (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)

Name:
Ping-Chih Chen
E-mail:
pc@zonatech.com
Address:
9489 East Ironwood Square Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85258 - 4578
Phone:
(480) 945-9988

Business Official (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)

Name:
Jennifer Scherr
E-mail:
jennifer@zonatech.com
Address:
9489 East Ironwood Square Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85258 - 4578
Phone:
(480) 945-9988
Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) :
Begin: 2
End: 4
Technical Abstract (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)

Despite advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods; application of CFD to an aeroelastic analysis is still not well-accepted by the aerospace industry. Currently, the unsteady panel methods still are the major workhorse used by the aerospace industry because these panel methods can generate the Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient (AIC) matrix. The AIC matrix is a multi-input-multi-output aerodynamic transfer function. Because it is an aerodynamic transfer function, the AIC matrix is independent of the structure and only depends on the aerodynamic geometry. Thus, once the aerodynamic configuration is fixed, the AIC matrix can be repeatedly used for structural design. However, because of the linear potential flow assumption, the unsteady panel methods are not valid at transonic Mach numbers. In these flow conditions, accurate unsteady aerodynamic forces can only be obtained by solving the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. Therefore, the aerospace industry would greatly benefit from having an innovative method that can efficiently generate the AIC matrix from the CFD methods.

The overall technical objective of this Phase I effort is to develop a CFD-based AIC generator to generate the structurally independent AIC matrices using high fidelity CFD codes. Using these AIC matrices, the generalized aerodynamic forces (GAF) can be rapidly computed for performing aeroelastic analysis. With a small computational effort, the AIC matrices also can generate the GAFs due to control surface kinematic mode and gust excitation.

Potential NASA Applications (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The Phase I effort is highly relevant to on-going and future NASA's fixed wing projects that involves several non-conventional design concepts such as the Blended Wing Body (BWB), and Supersonic Business Jet (SBJ). Because of the BWB's flying wing-type and the SBJ's slender fuselage designs, these designs are prone to the Body Freedom Flutter problem. The proposed work will offer a computational tool to the NASA designers for rapidly performing aeroelastic analysis throughout the structural design cycles of these non-conventional design.
 
Potential Non-NASA Applications (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)

Aircraft structural design requires flutter, aeroservoelastic (ASE), and gust analysis. Aeroelastic problems usually occur in the transonic flow regime at which the unsteady aerodynamics solved by the unsteady panel methods are not accurate. The proposed CFD-based AIC generator, once developed, will be well accepted by all aerospace companies.

Duration: 6

Form Generated on 06/29/2020 20:58:45