NASA STTR 2017 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 171 T1.02-9877
RESEARCH SUBTOPIC TITLE: Detailed Multiphysics Propulsion Modeling & Simulation Through Coordinated Massively Parallel Frameworks
PROPOSAL TITLE: A massively parallel framework for low-dissipation, multiphysics simulations of rocket engines

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (SBC): RESEARCH INSTITUTION (RI):
NAME: CASCADE Technologies, Inc. NAME: Stanford University
STREET: 2445 Faber Place, Suite 100 STREET: 3160 PORTER DR STE 100
CITY: Palo Alto CITY: Stanford
STATE/ZIP: CA  94303 - 3346 STATE/ZIP: CA  94304 - 1222
PHONE: (650) 521-0243 PHONE: (650) 736-7736

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Lee Shunn
shunn@cascadetechnologies.com
2445 Faber Place, Suite 100
Palo Alto, CA 94303 - 3346
(650) 521-0243

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Donna Carrig
carrig@cascadetechnologies.com
2445 Faber Place, Suite 100
Palo Alto, CA 94303 - 3346
(408) 482-3749

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 7

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Detailed Multiphysics Propulsion Modeling & Simulation Through Coordinated Massively Parallel Frameworks is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
In this proposal, researchers from Cascade Technologies and Stanford University outline a multi-year research plan to develop large-eddy simulation (LES) tools to predict and understand combustion instabilities in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Rocket instabilities are a notoriously complicated, multiscale problem involving nonlinear interactions between transcritical multiphase flows, turbulent mixing, combustion heat release, and acoustics. Each of these technical areas will be addressed to some extent during the course of the project. Central points of the Phase 1 plan include: adding real-fluid extensions to the open-source chemistry package Cantera, running CFD validation cases at rocket-relevant conditions, assessing the impact of low-dissipation numerical schemes on liquid sprays, and developing a unified multiphase formulation to span subcritical and supercritical conditions. These activities will set the stage for additional model developments and applied rocket simulations in Phase 2. Conclusions from the Phase 1 studies will help prioritize and plan the specific research areas to be addressed during Phase 2.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
- Pre-test prediction of combustion instabilities in rocket engines
- Improve numerical methods for multiphase simulations
- Improve modeling approaches for trans/supercritical flows
- Advance scalability and improve HPC workflows for massively-parallel simulation tools

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
- Reduce design costs and speed innovation in commercial rockets
- Improve efficiency and emissions in commercial aviation engines
- Optimize fuel injection and emissions in diesel and IC engines
- Increase fuel efficiency and system stability in supercritical power cycles
- Surfactant and bubbly flows in environmental and biological applications

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Launch Engine/Booster
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Simulation & Modeling

Form Generated on 04-19-17 12:45