NASA SBIR 2017 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 171 S2.01-9865
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Proximity Glare Suppression for Astronomical Coronagraphy
PROPOSAL TITLE: Technology Development for High-Actuator-Count MEMS DM Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Boston Micromachines Corporation
30 Spinelli Place
Cambridge, MA 02138 - 1070
(617) 868-4178

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dr. Peter J. Ryan
pjr@bostonmicromachines.com
30 Spinelli Place
Cambridge, MA 02138 - 1070
(617) 868-4178 Extension :206

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Mr. Paul Bierden
pab@bostonmicromachines.com
30 Spinelli Place
Cambridge, MA 02138 - 1070
(617) 868-4178 Extension :201

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 3

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Proximity Glare Suppression for Astronomical Coronagraphy is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
We propose to develop a design and manufacturing approach for a small-stroke, high-precision deformable mirror scalable to 10,000 actuators, that promises inherent advantages in scalability, yield, and reliability in comparison to current generation microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) DMs, to address a technology gap for next-generation planet finding instruments. Our proposed design aims to ensure high yield while maintaining a superb optical quality and retain the proven aspects of BMC?s commercial MEMS DM design and core manufacturing processes. Our objective in the Phase I project is to complete a design study for an innovative approach to scaling up our MEMS DM technology. We will develop new approaches to design and fabrication of routing lines by replacing the single wiring layer by interconnected, stacked wiring layers, and replacing wirebond technology with a flip-chip architecture for the device-to-package integration to overcome two key challenges that currently limit MEMS DM scalability to higher actuator counts. The outcome of the Phase I work will be the design and mask layout of the 10,000 actuator DM, the design and layout of the 10,000 channel PCB subassembly, and the development of a flip-chip bonding process that will enable the fabrication of this DM in a Phase II effort.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Small-stroke, high precision deformable mirrors and associated driving electronics scalable to 10,000 or more actuators have a few astronomical NASA commercial applications. The following applications apply to all Boston Micromachines mirrors that benefit from new manufacturing processes developed which increase yield and reliability.

Astronomy: Post applications in this sub-category can be broken into two categories: space telescopes and ground-based telescopes. In the case of space telescopes, there are a number of mission/mission concepts that require the wavefront control provided by the proposed high actuator count deformable mirrors. These include the Large UV/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVIOR), Alpha Centauri Exoplanet Satellite (ACESat), Exoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer (EXCEDE) and the Centaur pathfinder mission. For ground-based telescopes, BMC has already had success developing arrays up to 4096 elements for the Gemini Planet Imager and multiple high-yield smaller devices to high contrast imaging testbeds at the Space Telescope Science Institute and the University of Nice. BMC can achieve similar results for larger arrays requiring high-density electronic equipment for other new and existing installations such as the planned Extremely Large Telescopes (Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) and the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)).

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Small-stroke, high precision deformable mirrors (DMs) and associated driving electronics scalable to 10,000 or more actuators have a few commercial applications. The following applications apply to products produced by Boston Micromachines that benefit from manufacturing processes developed which increase yield and reliability.

Space surveillance: BMC has success developing arrays up to 4096 elements for astronomy which can be used for space-based systems. These programs are funded by Department of Defense administrations with classified agendas.

Optical communication: Lasercomm systems would benefit from this new architecture for long-range secure communication. Also, fiber optic communications can take advantage of our devices in an optical switching capacity.

Microscopy: By increasing reliability and yield, the component cost for DMs will enable users to purchase high-resolution equipment for improvement of various microscopy modalities. Modalities affected include multi-photon excitation fluorescence (MPEF), second- and/or third-harmonic generation (SHG/THG), and coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and super-resolution localization microscopy techniques.

Pulse-Shaping: Laser science strives to create a better shaped pulse for applications such as laser marking and machining, and material ablation and characterization. The use of a high-actuator count array for these purposes will enable new science and more refined techniques.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Adaptive Optics
Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) and smaller
Mirrors

Form Generated on 04-19-17 12:59