NASA SBIR 2017 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 171 S1.09-9887
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Cryogenic Systems for Sensors and Detectors
PROPOSAL TITLE: Regenerators for 10 Kelvin Cryocoolers

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Atlas Scientific
1367 Camino Robles Way
San Jose, CA 95120 - 4925
(408) 507-0906

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dr. Ali Kashani
akashani@atlasscientific.com
1367 Camino Robles Way
San Jose, CA 95120 - 4925
(408) 507-0906

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dr. Ali Kashani
akashani@atlasscientific.com
1367 Camino Robles Way
San Jose, CA 95120 - 4925
(408) 507-0906

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 3

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Cryogenic Systems for Sensors and Detectors is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Future NASA astrophysics and exploration missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration and reductions in overall system mass and power consumption. For the coolers required, Stirling and pulse tube coolers offer the best opportunities. At present, the efficiency of these coolers is limited by the effectiveness of low-temperature-stage regenerators. Below about 60 K, two factors play key roles in reducing the effectiveness of regenerators. The heat capacity of most materials falls rapidly with decreasing temperature, thus, reducing the efficiency. Also, materials commonly used are only available in powder form, a form known to raise reliability issues. In the proposed effort, we will address both the aspect of high-efficiency and regenerator durability. First, a Rare Earth alloy, that below 60 K has a heat capacity higher than that of commonly used materials, will be configured in a well-defined intricate porous matrix; Secondly, both the void fraction and the ratio of surface area to solid fraction of the regenerator matrix will be tailored using a new approach, addressing that both form and thermal characteristics are essential to achieving a high efficiency.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Astrophysical, astrobiology and exploration missions planned by NASA depend on the availability of reliable and efficient multi-stage cryocoolers. Advanced astrophysics missions such as the James Web Space Telescope (JWST) require low temperature cooling for detectors and their associated optics directly. Missions requiring a large cooled telescope mirror would be impossible without efficient low temperature closed-cycle cryocoolers. Further, the long-term storage of cryogenic propellants, in particular liquid hydrogen is of interest. The conservation of propellant on long-term space flight will be an enabling technology for exploration and planetary missions.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
There are a number of commercial applications which require cryocoolers that will benefit from high efficiency low-temperature regenerators. A partial list includes: - Superconducting electronics - Superconducting magnets for MRI systems - Superconducting magnets for power generation and energy storage - SQUID magnetometers for heart and brain studies - HTS filters for the communication industry - Liquefaction of industrial gases - Cryopumps for semiconductor manufacturing.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Cryogenic/Fluid Systems
Processing Methods

Form Generated on 04-19-17 12:59