NASA SBIR 2016 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 16-2 S1.05-8269
PHASE 1 CONTRACT NUMBER: NNX16CG33P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument Enabling Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Luxel Corporation
60 Saltspring Drive, PO Box 1879
Friday Harbor, WA 98250 - 8040
(360) 378-4137

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
David Grove
david.grove@luxel.com
60 Saltspring Dr
Friday Harbor, WA 98250 - 8040
(360) 378-4137

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dianne Hall
dianne.hall@luxel.com
60 Saltspring Drive, PO Box 1879
Friday Harbor, WA 98250 - 8040
(360) 378-4137

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Particles and Field Sensors and Instrument Enabling Technologies is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Implementing graphene foils in existing neutral atom detector designs will increase their angular and energy resolution, and also improve their mass discrimination and usable energy range. Graphene atomic uniformity and low mass density offer natural advantages over amorphous carbon foils in time-of-flight instruments. We expect that Phase II will yield flight-ready prototype foils available for rocket or pathfinder missions with substantial improvements in instrument performance. Graphene foils can also enable improved designs, for instance with lower mass or lower power consumption. Graphene is potentially useful in very low energy neutral atom detection, e.g. E<10eV.
Graphene has advantages over amorphous carbon such as 3X higher optical absorption than amorphous carbon, high infrared crystalline uniformity. Phase I achieved a number of technical "firsts" for graphene and nanohole arrays, including:
-the world's largest grid-supported single-layer graphene(>4cm2) -SLG on nanohole arrays with hole coverage of >99%
-a method for attaching single-layer graphene to mesh without adhesive
-bilayer graphene membranes with >95% coverage on commercial mesh -Lyman alpha blocking of 99.8% using aluminum nanohole arrays
Our Phase II effort will continue to improve microgrids, nanogrids and graphene for LENA detectors. In particular, we will
1. Fabricate bilayer graphene (BLG) on microgrids as a better-performing foil for existing LENA instrument designs.
2. Fabricate pristine SLG on nanogrids, extending TOF detectors to <200eV.
3. Investigate surface modification of graphene to enable detection of <10eV neutral atoms.
4. Make prototype samples for other NASA and non-NASA applications.
Compared with existing foils, our proposed SLG structure reduces scattering, improves low energy signal, and improves energy resolution. The structure reduces the serial losses and increases the effective collection area.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Neutral atom detector foils and particle detector foils
The graphene foils we report in Phase I have excellent energy resolution and low energy signal compared with existing foils.We have shown prototype grids which appear suitable for supporting bilayer graphene in an instrument-usable configuration.

Graphene antistatic and emissive coatings on particle beam and EUV filters
Present antistatic coatings and contamination blocking filter coatings are made from >5nm thick amorphous carbon. Graphene has higher conductivity than amorphous carbon, but is only 0.3nm thick. This represents a considerable improvement in electron scattering cross section, thermal emissivity, and mass density.

Nanohole arrays for EUV filters
Presently the wavelength range 50-120nm has no viable narrow-band filter. Imaging of EUV spectral lines needs wavelength-selectable bandpass filters. Availability of solar-blind bandpass EUV filters will enable imaging of, for instance, elemental plasma processes in planetary atmospheres.

Miscellaneous Instrument Graphene Foils
Cooled instruments require a membrane to separate environmental contaminants without otherwise affecting detection or beam optics. For example, cryodetectors, such as X-ray microcalorimeters, require contamination blocking elements to prevent UHV or spacecraft contaminants from adsorbing onto the detector and causing soft X-ray opacity. Currently, these barrier foils are 50nm-100nm thick.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Nanohole arrays for EUV filters and High-Harmonic-Laser Order Selectors
Presently the wavelength range 50-120nm has no viable transmission filters except for broad-band elemental In and Sn foils. Detection of spectral lines, and generation of laser lines, needs wavelength-selectable bandpass filters in this wavelength range. Synchrotrons and Free-electron lasers rely on the elemental properties of foils for harmonic rejection, greatly limiting the utility of synchrotrons in the 50-120nm wavelength range. The proposed nanohole arrays can improve the selectability and performance of spectral filters in this range of wavelengths.

Miscellaneous Instrument Graphene Foils
Instruments such as X-ray microcalorimeters and electron beam systems, require a membrane to separate environmental contaminants without otherwise affecting detection or beam optics. For example, cryogenic detectors, such as X-ray microcalorimeters, require contamination blocking elements to prevent UHV or spacecraft background contaminants from adsorbing onto the detector and causing soft X-ray opacity. Currently, these barrier foils are 50nm-100nm in thickness, and are highly absorbing for X-rays <300eV. Graphene is a promising low mass contamination barrier, since is less than 1nm thick.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Analytical Instruments (Solid, Liquid, Gas, Plasma, Energy; see also Sensors)
Coatings/Surface Treatments
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Filtering
Ionizing Radiation
Lasers (Medical Imaging)
Microfabrication (and smaller; see also Electronics; Mechanical Systems; Photonics)
Nanomaterials
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Ultraviolet

Form Generated on 03-07-17 15:43