NASA SBIR 2016 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 16-2 H2.04-7766
PHASE 1 CONTRACT NUMBER: NNX16CM32P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Cryogenic Fluid Management for In-Space Transportation
PROPOSAL TITLE: A High Efficiency Cryocooler for In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Creare, LLC
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755 - 3116
(603) 643-3800

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Mark V Zagarola
mvz@creare.com
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755 - 3116
(603) 643-3800 Extension :2360

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Robert J Kline-Schoder
contractsmgr@creare.com
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755 - 3116
(603) 643-3800 Extension :2487

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Cryogenic Fluid Management for In-Space Transportation is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
NASA is considering multiple missions involving long-term cryogen storage in space. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen are the typical cryogens as they provide the highest specific impulse of practical chemical propellants. These cryogens are stored at temperatures of nominally 20 K for hydrogen and 90 K for oxygen. Due to the large size of these tanks, refrigeration loads to maintain zero-boil-off are high, on the order of tens of watts at 20 K and hundreds of watts at 90 K. Space cryocoolers have been developed for cooling space sensors that have modest cooling loads and are not suitable for high capacity applications. On this program, we proposed to develop a high capacity turbo-Brayton cryocooler that provides 150 W of refrigeration at 90 K. On the Phase I project, we developed a preliminary design of the 90 K cryocooler, assessing its size, mass, performance, and maturity. The proposed cryocooler significantly exceeds the performance targets set forth in the solicitation -- the cryocooler specific power is only 8 W/W (solicitation goal of 15 W/W), and the specific mass is 0.4 kg/W (solicitation goal of 12 kg/W). On the Phase II project, we propose to develop and demonstrate the least mature components, the compressor and its inverter drive. On a future Phase III project, we plan to build and demonstrate an engineering model cryocooler. Successful completion of this project fills a clear void in space cryocooler technology.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Space applications for high-capacity turbo-Brayton cryocoolers include cryogen storage for planetary and extraterrestrial exploration missions, CEVs, extended-life orbital transfer vehicles, long-term geosynchronous missions, in-space propellant depots and extraterrestrial bases, and cooling systems for observation platforms requiring large arrays of infrared and X-ray detectors. Terrestrial applications include cooling for spaceport cryogen storage and transportation systems. The highly reliable and space-proven turbo-Brayton cryocooler is ideal for these missions.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Private sector applications for high-capacity turbo-Brayton cryocoolers include cooling for laboratory- and industrial-scale gas separation, liquefaction, cryogen storage and cryogen transportation systems; high-temperature superconducting magnets in motors, generators, transmission lines, and magnetic resonance imaging systems; liquid hydrogen fuel cell storage for the automotive industry; and commercial orbital transfer vehicles and satellites.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Cryogenic/Fluid Systems

Form Generated on 03-07-17 15:43