NASA SBIR 2016 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 16-1 H4.02-8142
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Trace Contaminant Control for Advanced Spacesuit Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: Advanced Supported Liquid Membranes for Ammonia and Formaldehyde Control in Spacesuits

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Reaction Systems, Inc.
17301 West Colfax Avenue, #160
Golden, CO 80401 - 4892
(303) 881-7992

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dr. David Wickham
wickham@rxnsys.com
17301 W. Colfax Avenue #160
Golden, CO 80401 - 4892
(720) 352-7161

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Todd Leeson
tleeson@rxnsys.com
17301 West Colfax Avenue #160
Golden, CO 80401 - 4892
(303) 881-7992

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 1
End: 3

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Trace Contaminant Control for Advanced Spacesuit Applications is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
With plans to transition to the Rapid Cycle Amine system for CO2 control in the Portable Life Support System used for extra vehicular activities (EVA), NASA has a need to improve the method for controlling trace contaminants, specifically ammonia (NH3) and formaldehyde (CH2O), which have the potential to exceed space craft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC) by the end of the EVA.

A very simple way to remove ammonia and formaldehyde would be with a membrane that would allow ammonia and formaldehyde to escape to space vacuum while retaining oxygen (O2). Reaction Systems, Inc. (RSI) proposes to develop a supported liquid membrane (SLM) that incorporates a facilitated transport mechanism for the control of ammonia and formaldehyde in spacesuits. An SLM consists of a reactive liquid supported within a porous membrane and takes advantage of the difference in chemical reactivity between the compound of interest and oxygen to achieve the needed selectivity and permeation rate. In addition to reacting with the contaminant, the liquid must have extremely low vapor pressure to prevent loss by evaporation, and it must have low viscosity to allow diffusion across the membrane. As part of the development, RSI will prepare and characterize new functionalized liquid sorbents with near zero vapor pressure, and evaluate their effectiveness for ammonia and formaldehyde removal.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The most immediate application of the technology being proposed herein is the control of trace contaminants, like ammonia and formaldehyde, in a space suit. The same technology could also find application for trace contaminant control in spacecraft cabins and on the International Space Station (ISS). Currently, an acid treated, non-regenerable carbon bed is used to remove ammonia. However, a highly selective SLM vented to space would be a continuous system that demands very little power, with negligible losses of nitrogen or oxygen.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
This technology could also find application for trace contaminant control to improve indoor air quality in factories and laboratories. For example, workers are exposed to formaldehyde in the manufacture of formaldehyde-based resins and their use in particleboard products. Morticians and laboratory workers may also be exposed to formaldehyde. Risk of exposure to ammonia is high in the manufacture of fertilizers. For these applications a vacuum pump would be used on the low pressure side to provide the driving force for separation. With the very high selectivity potentially available with an SLM, the flow through the pump would consist primarily of the contaminants and very little oxygen or nitrogen. This would minimize the flow through the pump and therefore the required power.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Essential Life Resources (Oxygen, Water, Nutrients)
Protective Clothing/Space Suits/Breathing Apparatus
Remediation/Purification
Smart/Multifunctional Materials

Form Generated on 04-26-16 15:14