NASA SBIR 2016 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 16-1 H2.04-8412
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Cryogenic Fluid Management for In-Space Transportation
PROPOSAL TITLE: Thermally Insulative Structural Connection for Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Paragon Space Development Corporation
3481 East Michigan Street
Tucson, AZ 85714 - 2221
(520) 382-1705

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Mr. Chad Bower
cbower@paragonsdc.com
813 14th Street
Golden, CO 80401 - 1866
(520) 382-1705

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Mrs. Carole Sue Leon
csleon@paragonsdc.com
3481 East Michigan Street
Tucson, AZ 85714 - 2221
(520) 382-4814

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Cryogenic Fluid Management for In-Space Transportation is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Paragon Space Development Corporation and Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) propose a unique solution that thermally isolates the upper stage rocket from a payload on orbit while still providing adequate structural connection for orbital maneuvers. Cryogenic fluids such as LH2 and LOX are ideal upper stage propellants because of their high specific impulse. Unfortunately, the high thermal conductivity of the adapter and payload interface or between the O2 and H2 tanks themselves allows significant heat transfer between the sections, ultimately opening a relief valve that vents the propellant to space. Once vented, the propellant is lost forever resulting in a limited on-orbit useful life for cryogenic upper stages. The proposed solution provides an insulative structural connection between the payload and the upper stage utilizing an inflatable annulus with performance attributes from TRLA's Ultra High Performance Vessel (UHPV) technology that provides an inflatable structure with fully determinate load paths and the highest specific strength and stiffness of any soft-goods architecture. By using the existing payload adapter technology and separation systems for the ascent, the long heritage and reliability of these systems are maintained. Once on orbit, the primary structural connection between payload and adapter separate as normal while the inflatable structure is deployed. The pressurized fabric ring acts as a thermal insulator significantly reducing the undesired heat leak while still providing structural characteristics at 0.2 g's of sustained compressive loads for station keeping, attitude control and telemetry. The innovation will ultimately allow cryogenic propellants stored in an on-orbit depot to have a longer storage life while still utilizing the services of an attached upper stage. Additionally, it will allow an upper stage with a conventional payload to loiter for longer periods in LEO before too much propellant boils off.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The proposed solution has application to NASA as a thermal disconnect solution between cryogenic tanks on the SLS Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) while still providing the necessary structural characteristics for station keeping, attitude control and telemetry on orbit. The proposed solution will greatly extend the on-orbit life of propellant depots providing NASA improved mission flexibility for Exploration Missions. The innovative technology also has future application for propellant depots, payload fairings, and system habitats.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The innovation has application to commercial launch providers for improvement to their cryogenic upper stage offering a thermal disconnect between the upper stage and payload. The proposed technology allows for longer on-orbit propellant storage, services, and mission flexibility for Exploration Missions. The innovative technology also has future application for propellant depots, payload fairings, and system habitats.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Cryogenic/Fluid Systems
Deployment
Passive Systems
Pressure & Vacuum Systems
Structures
Textiles

Form Generated on 04-26-16 15:14