NASA SBIR 2016 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 16-1 H1.01-8453
SUBTOPIC TITLE: In situ Resource Utilization - Production of Feedstock for Manufacturing and Construction
PROPOSAL TITLE: ISP3: In-Situ Printing Plastic Production System for Space Additive Manufacturing

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Altius Space Machines, Inc.
3001 Industrial Lane, Unit #5
Broomfield, CO 80020 - 7153
(303) 438-7110

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Nathan A Davis
ndavis@altius-space.com
3001 Industrial Lane, Unit #5
Broomfield, CO 80020 - 7153
(801) 230-6754

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Jonathan A Goff
jongoff@altius-space.com
3001 Industrial Lane, Unit #5
Broomfield, CO 80020 - 7153
(801) 362-2310

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 3

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
In situ Resource Utilization - Production of Feedstock for Manufacturing and Construction is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
The ability to "live off of the land" via in-situ resource utilization has long been recognized as a key capability for enabling the affordable development of space. While most of the focus has been on the production of bulk quantities of rocket propellants such as Liquid Methane, Liquid Hydrogen, and Liquid Oxygen from extraterrestrial water and carbon dioxide sources, there has recently been an increase of interest in the production of structural materials as well from in-situ resources, particularly materials that can be used for Additive Manufacturing.

For this Phase 1 effort, Altius and its team members propose development of an In-Situ Printing Plastics Production (ISP3) system, that can take methane and oxygen inputs from various in-situ sources, and convert them into High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) filaments for use in a fused deposition modeling (FDM) style 3D printer, such as those developed by Made In Space. In Phase 1, Altius and its team members will simulate and test the three primary subsystems for ISP3: an Oxidative Coupling of Methane reactor that converts the methane into olefins and water, an olefin separation membrane that separates olefins from other outputs of the OCM reactor, and an innovative polymerization reactor that does not use physical catalysts for initiating the polyethylene polymerization reaction. Successful completion of these experiments and subsequent scaling and process refinement tasks will result in an updated ISP3 process design for Phase 2, raising the TRL of ISP3 from TRL 2 to TRL3. Phase 2 will focus on production of an integrated brassboard ISP3 prototype capable of producing small quantities of HDPE filament from methane and oxygen inputs. This will raise the system TRL to 5.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
In addition to long-term applications of ISP3 for producing HDPE for manned missions and colonies on places like Mars and Venus, Altius and its partners have developed a concept for demonstrating the ISP3 system on the International Space Station, for producing limited quantities of HDPE filament for the Made In Space Additive Manufacturing Facility, leveraging waste materials already on-board the ISS. This waste material source would likely be available on most other crew-tended space facilities, enabling the production of HDPE filaments anywhere humans go in the Solar System.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Three potential Non-NASA applications for ISP3 are:
1- Production of HDPE on non-NASA space facilities, such as those planned by Bigelow Aerospace.
2- Production of small quantities of HDPE for 3D printers on military submarines.
3- Production of small quantities of HDPE for 3D printers using natural gas feedstocks at remote locations such as military forward operating bases, and research facilities in remote regions such as Antarctica.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
In Situ Manufacturing
Lasers (Machining/Materials Processing)
Polymers
Process Monitoring & Control
Processing Methods

Form Generated on 04-26-16 15:14