NASA SBIR 2015 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 15-1 S1.07-8995
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Airborne Measurement Systems
PROPOSAL TITLE: 14-Decades Calibration in Airborne Detectors for Environmental Science (14DeCADES)

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Biospherical Instruments Inc.
5340 Riley Street
San Diego, CA 92110 - 2621
(619) 686-1888

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dr. John H Morrow
morrow@biospherical.com
5340 Riley Street
San Diego, CA 92110 - 2621
(619) 686-1888 Extension :115

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Dr. John H Morrow
morrow@biospherical.com
5340 Riley Street
San Diego, CA 92110 - 2621
(619) 686-1888 Extension :115

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Airborne Measurement Systems is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
The 14-DeCADES SBIR leverages the results of a FY13 spontaneous IRAD to characterize and test (Phase 1) and subsequently design and build (Phase 2) a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) multiwaveband sensor for airborne sensing of ocean color in conditions of very low light. The new instrument will pair ruggedized, miniature photomultiplier tubes with silicon photodetectors to create so-called hybridnamic detectors for use in both radiance and irradiance radiometers, featuring 14 decades of linear dynamic range. The new radiometers will be suitable for making airborne optical measurements of the atmosphere and ocean in low-light regimes wherein high-quality optical data are rarely available. Anticipated uses include improved calibration and validation data collection for next-generation NASA satellite missions emphasizing turbid atmospheres and waters. Basic research uses include nighttime diurnal or polar winter studies (e.g. aerosol optical depth from shadow band irradiance instruments), and other moon-lit measurements including airborne ocean color missions. Phase 1 will leverage a technology readiness level (TRL) 3 prototype, bringing the work to TRL 4 during six months. If the Phase 2 work is successful, the activity will advance the TRL of the new instrument from a value of 3 (based on the IRAD prototype instrument) to a value of 6 over the period of the SBIR Phase 1 and 2. During Phase 1, necessary new fixturing and testing software and protocols will be developed, and a parallel engineering characterization of the IRAD prototype will confirm the instrument architecture. The resulting recommendations from the engineering tests will be used to establish the specifications for a Phase 2 sensor suite, to be proposed at the end of the project as a follow-on activity.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
This SBIR Phase I and II would result specifically in a cornerstone product for BSI's airborne instrument line. We see this development being used wherever an airborne radiometer has been used in the past and where extended dynamic range or nighttime activities were desired. By coupling NASA-funded microradiometer detectors with the appropriate COTS PMTs, the 14-DeCADES project captures the best features of both technologies: high-speed and wide dynamic range, for both radiance and irradiance sensors. The work proposed here may be incorporated into a variety of configurations appropriate to addressing aspects of the Carbon cycle and Ecosystems Roadmap, where the wide dynamic range configurations, which is not possible with existing technology, can be applied. In addition to testing and validating radiometric models, these systems have an immediate application in airborne ocean color validation studies for PACE/ACE, and can be used to support systematic observations using VIIRS/NPP and VIIRS/NPOESS.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
This SBIR Phase I and II would result specifically in a cornerstone product for BSI's airborne instrument line. We see this development being used wherever an airborne radiometer has been used in the past and where extended dynamic range or nighttime activities were desired. Non-NASA benefits of this technology parallel the direct benefit to NASA, with the extension of increased opportunities for multidisciplinary airborne studies in the field. International and domestic potential customers for this technology include government, university, and privately funded researchers interested in ocean color, satellite calibration and validation at high latitudes, phytoplankton ecology, fisheries, or photodegradation.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Multispectral/Hyperspectral
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Radiometric
Ultraviolet
Visible

Form Generated on 04-23-15 15:37