NASA SBIR 2015 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 15-1 S1.06-9867
SUBTOPIC TITLE: In Situ Sensors and Sensor Systems for Lunar and Planetary Science
PROPOSAL TITLE: Low Power Miniature Colloidal High Vacuum Pump

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Connecticut Analytical Corporation
696 Amity Road
Bethany, CT 06524 - 3006
(203) 393-9666

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Joseph J Bango
jbango@ctanalytical.com
696 Amity Road
Bethany, CT 06524 - 3006
(203) 393-9666 Extension :21

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Joseph J Bango
jbango@ctanalytical.com
696 Amity Road
Bethany, CT 06524 - 3006
(203) 393-9666 Extension :21

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 6

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
In Situ Sensors and Sensor Systems for Lunar and Planetary Science is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Shortly after NASA made the most recent planetary science SBIR topics public, we began discussing the possibility of translating our experience in maximizing momentum transfer by specialized electrospray jets into a vacuum for micro-satellite propulsion as a new alternative to the diffusion pump concept. Indeed, what is currently being done for "colloidal propulsion" parallels the requirements for an effective vapor-jet pump. The attractive feature of colloidal droplets produced by the electrospray phenomena is significant. Principal among these is the lack of volatility of the working fluid, negating the need for diffusion pump heater concepts, and the ability to produce ions or droplets at a known velocity that exceed the thermal velocity of target pump gases using only milliwatts of power. Over the past 30+ years, no significant advance in vacuum pump concepts save for the turbo-molecular pump has been realized. The proposed technology offers a potential for game-changing new technology that may obviate a turbo pump in many applications while promising to provide significant cost savings with unprecedented reliability and longevity.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Spacecraft laboratories, such as on the ISS, could benefit greatly from the success of the proposed technology. Using the vacuum of space for an analytical instrument is highly undesirable due to the safety factor of deliberately creating any leaks on a spacecraft or space station, and the discharge of atmospheric gases could affect the space vessel station keeping or trajectory. As a result, there is a need for a means to create a vacuum for analytical devices such as mass spectrometers used on the ISS, probes for interplanetary missions, and possible future hand-held use by astronauts. The proposed electrospray diffusion pump offers the potential to be applied to all aforementioned applications.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Over the past decade, especially the terrorist attacks of 9/11, there has been an increasing demand for sensitive chemical, biological, and explosive detection devices. Mass spectrometers, unlike some spectrometers such as ion mobility (IMS), require a partial pressure region to scan for a given mass number indicative of the trace species of interest. Probably the most significant hurdle yet to overcome is how one can create a cost effective, small, and low power vacuum system to make mass spectrometers portable. The proposed technology offers a radical new method to achieve cost, weight, power, and compatibility goals for a new generation of portable analytical instruments.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Analytical Methods
Biological (see also Biological Health/Life Support)
Biological Signature (i.e., Signs Of Life)
Health Monitoring & Sensing (see also Sensors)

Form Generated on 04-23-15 15:37