NASA SBIR 2012 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 12-2 S1.06-8661
PHASE 1 CONTRACT NUMBER: NNX13CG21P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Cryogenic Systems for Sensors and Detectors
PROPOSAL TITLE: Cryocooler With Cold Compressor for Deep Space Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Madison CryoGroup, LLC.
701 Seneca Place
Madison, WI 53711 - 2917
(608) 338-8387

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
James R Maddocks
jamesmaddocks@att.net
701 Seneca Place
Madison, WI 53711 - 2917
(608) 338-8387

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
James R Maddocks
jamesmaddocks@att.net
701 Seneca Place
Madison, WI 53711 - 2917
(608) 338-8387

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Cryogenic Systems for Sensors and Detectors is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
The innovation is a high-frequency single-stage pulse tube cryocooler (PTC) that operates at a heat rejection temperature of 150 K. It employs a flexure-bearing cold compressor operating at that same heat rejection temperature. High frequency, low temperature pulse-tube cryocoolers are a promising technology for future NASA missions. Such missions will require cryocoolers providing cooling capacities in excess of 0.3 W at 35 K with heat rejection capability to temperature sinks as low as 150 K at input powers up to 20 W. Presently there are no cooling systems operating at this heat rejection temperature.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
NASA applications include missions to remote locations and orbits where there is a low level of solar input. Low intensity sunlight affords the benefit of a lower rejection temperature and improved cryocooler performance, for the same cold end temperature, and permits a decrease in system size and power draw. Only a third the power draw is predicted for the 35-K cold end case. Serendipitously, this agrees well with the drop in power generation due to dim solar light on remote missions. Taken together, the effects favor employing smaller cryocooler systems specifically designed for reduced rejection temperatures and system envelopes.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The design and construction process is targeted to produce a space-born cryocooler that will have a host of qualities in-demand for space missions. However, its small system size, efficient performance, long-life reliability, low input power and low vibration all make this cryocooler a high-value product that meets the demand of businesses aiming to deliver truly high-quality products for systems that require low failure rates. The proposed cooler is operable over a wide range of loads and temperatures. Several government agencies outside NASA (MDA, Air Force) and various commercial entities have interest in integrating small and efficient high-frequency cryocoolers into their equipment. For the proposed technology there are many potential business and civilian applications that require compact, reliable and efficient cryogenic cooling, such as: Cryopumps for semiconductor manufacturing, Superconducting magnets for MRI systems, SQUID magnetometers for heart and brain studies, HTS filters fo

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Cryogenic/Fluid Systems

Form Generated on 03-04-14 13:38