NASA SBIR 2012 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 12-1 H10.02-9641
SUBTOPIC TITLE: ISS Demonstration & Development of Improved Exploration Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: Passive Devices for Advanced Fluid Management aboard Spacecraft

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
IRPI LLC
27827 SE Heiple Rd
Eagle Creek, OR 97022 - 9669
(503) 974-6655

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Ryan Marcos Jenson
rjenson@irpillc.com
27827 SE Heiple Rd
Eagle Creek, OR 97022 - 9669
(503) 545-2501

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Ryan Marcos Jenson
rjenson@irpillc.com
27827 SE Heiple Rd
Eagle Creek, OR 97022 - 9669
(503) 545-2501

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
ISS Demonstration & Development of Improved Exploration Technologies is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Acute challenges are faced by the designers of fluid systems for spacecraft because of the persistently unfamiliar and unforgiving low-g environment. For example, most fluid systems aboard spacecraft are impacted by the presence of capillary forces—a poor understanding of which has led to poorly performing life support equipment. Despite an increasing number of flight investigations concerning capillary phenomena, no broad re-assessment and re-design of low-g fluids systems has been undertaken. We propose a fundamental change to spacecraft fluid systems design. In this Phase I research, concurrent with a modern review of all candidate spacecraft fluid systems, we will design and demonstrate two new geometric flow components for the critically and persistently problematic unit operations of in-line bubble and liquid rivulet separations. The new components can be exploited across a variety of spacecraft fluids systems to markedly increase system reliability and performance. Many other components are envisioned as inspired by recent results from space experiments and the application of novel geometries. Such components offer the advantages of no power, no moving parts, and little to no pressure loss as they passively separate fluid phases using capillary forces and motive fluid streams.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Challenges remain for design engineers to produce robust fluids handling equipment for spacecraft such as critical life support systems: i.e., oxygen supply, air revitalization, thermal management systems, water reclamation, medical fluids, and others. The new passive phase separating components to be designed and developed in this Phase I effort can be exploited across a variety of spacecraft fluids systems to markedly increase system reliability and performance. They may also be employed throughout spacecraft in systems from fluid feed lines in hydrolysers, to condensing heat exchangers, urine processors, portable life support systems, plant and animal habitats, food preparation facilities, propellant management systems, and others—basically, all liquid systems on spacecraft: coolants, water, aqueous solutions, fuels, and cryogens. The components offer the advantages of no moving parts, little to no pressure loss, and no additional power consumption, and could benefit greatly in terms of increased TRL via testing aboard the ISS.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
This research applies recent advances in the study of microgravity capillary flows and phenomena. We expect to change the overall approach to spacecraft fluid systems design and provide common geometries that naturally and routinely separate fluid phases in a manner more akin to terrestrial applications and experience. Our primary intent for low-gravity demonstration aboard the ISS is to increase TRL levels and gain wider acceptance for our non-traditional approach among the aerospace community. However, terrestrial applications are identified and pursued as part of our broader commercial objectives in Phase I and Phase II. Applications of our design approach to routine microfluidic flows relating to fuel delivery and biomedical drug delivery represent significant growth opportunities.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Analytical Methods
Cryogenic/Fluid Systems
Essential Life Resources (Oxygen, Water, Nutrients)
Fluids
Heat Exchange
Medical
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Passive Systems
Remediation/Purification
Simulation & Modeling
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Waste Storage/Treatment


Form Generated on 03-28-13 15:21