NASA SBIR 2008 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 08-1 S4.04-8809
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Reusable Flight Software
PROPOSAL TITLE: Evolution of the 'Trick' Dynamic Software Executive and Model Libraries for Reusable Flight Software

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Odyssey Space Research
1120 NASA Parkway Suite 505
Houston, TX 77058 - 3364
(281) 488-7953

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
David G Hammen
dhammen@odysseysr.com
1120 NASA Parkway, Suite 505
Houston, TX 77058 - 3364
(281) 488-7953

Expected Technology Readiness Level (TRL) upon completion of contract: 3 to 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
In response to a need for cost-effective small satellite missions, Odyssey Space Research is proposing the development of a common flight software executive and a fundamental set of reconfigurable flight software modules. This application will directly affect the development cost by avoiding the need to develop software from scratch and allowing the efficient reuse of flight software even across vehicles. Odyssey proposes to use NASA's Trick simulation environment to form the basis of the flight software executive and to use NASA's Common Model Library to form the basis for the reconfigurable modules. Trick is currently capable of producing a software architecture that is easily modified to allow the use of software modules in the production of a simulation framework. We are proposing modifying and adapting Trick for the production of software that easily moves out of the simulation realm and into the embedded flight software realm. Our proposed approach to providing reusable flight software is innovative in that it takes a well established open platform simulation tool and advances it to a level where it can be combined with reconfigurable software modules. This in turn can be used to produce highly reconfigurable flight software allowing for the same software development environment to be used across the entire life cycle of the system.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Reconfigurable and re-usable flight software has potential application to any developer of spacecraft with missions that are contained in the defined software module envelope. Additional modules will likely expand the potential scope and applicability. The range of "potential post applications" for NASA can include science missions, university sponsored science missions formation flying or constellation missions (i.e., missions with multiple identical, or nearly identical spacecraft), and ultimately service missions (e.g., weather, communications, etc.). Any NASA mission in the small spacecraft class would be a candidate for re-using the software. The motivation to reduce cost will attract significant interest and buy-in once it is demonstrated on a real, flying spacecraft -- most probably on a NASA-based mission such as the "small spacecraft build" project. Since this approach involves a paradigm shift among spacecraft developers, applying the same architecture and software on two similarly classed (but not identical) missions would provide the best proof.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Reconfigurable and re-usable flight software has potential application to any developer of spacecraft with missions that are contained in the defined software module envelope. Additional modules will likely expand the potential scope and applicability. The range of "potential post applications" can include government agency sponsored science missions, formation flying or constellation missions (i.e., missions with multiple identical, or nearly identical spacecraft), and ultimately service missions (e.g., weather, communications, etc.). The motivation to reduce cost will attract significant interest and buy-in once it is demonstrated on a real, flying spacecraft -- most probably on a NASA-based mission such as the "small spacecraft build" project. Since this approach involves a paradigm shift among spacecraft developers, applying the same architecture and software on two similarly classed (but not identical) missions would provide the best proof. The Department of Defense is a large potential market that would likely adopt and even expand on this concept once it has been implemented.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Computer System Architectures
On-Board Computing and Data Management
Software Development Environments
Testing Requirements and Architectures


Form Generated on 11-24-08 11:56