NASA SBIR 2007 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 07-1 A2.01-9728
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Materials and Structures for Future Aircraft
PROPOSAL TITLE: Durable, High Thermal Conductivity Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites for Turbine Engine Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Hyper-Therm High-Temperature Composites
18411 Gothard Street, Units B&C
Huntington Beach, CA 92648 - 1208
(714) 375-4085

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Robert Shinavski
robert.shinavski@htcomposites.com
18411 Gothard Street, Units B&C
Huntington Beach, CA 92648 - 1208
(714) 375-4085

Expected Technology Readiness Level (TRL) upon completion of contract: 3 to 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Durable, creep-resistant ceramic composites are necessary to meet the increased operating temperatures targeted for advanced turbine engines. Higher operating temperatures result in improved performance, fuel savings (higher efficiency) and reduced pollution. Silicon melt infiltrated ceramic composites have been identified as having a 2400F maximum use temperature, which does not take advantage of the highest temperature capability of the newest generation of near stoichiometric SiC fibers. Conversely ceramic composites containing a SiC matrix derived from chemical vapor infiltration have sufficient stability to take full advantage of the creep resistance of the fibers. For many applications, no existing matrix system for SiC-reinforced composites has sufficient through-thickness thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures to result in low thermally induced stresses; such that longer service life at higher temperatures can be achieved. This Phase I work will demonstrate a higher temperature melt infiltrated matrix that is stable to 2950F, and thus allows the full temperature capability of the latest generation SiC fiber reinforcements to be used. This higher temperature capability is combined with a significantly higher predicted elevated temperature thermal conductivity for the ceramic composite, which will reduce the thermally induced stresses on the material that often dominate the stress state on the material. The Phase I effort will produce ceramic composites with this higher temperature melt infiltrated matrix and perform both thermal and mechanical property evaluations at ambient and elevated temperatures to demonstrate the benefits of the system.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Commercial applications for NASA include application in the hot gas path of turbine engines for supersonic aircraft. Specific components include turbine shrouds, combustor liners, and turbine vanes. Other applications for silicon carbide fiber reinforced composites include applications for advanced air-breathing propulsion systems for hypervelocity vehicles, hot structure, and actively cooled hot structures, as well as high temperature heat exchangers that can benefit from the higher operating temperatures and high temperature thermal conductivity.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Commercial applications include application in military and potentially commercial turbine engines for aircraft, and land-based turbine components for power generation. Other applications that can benefit from the higher operating temperatures and high temperature thermal conductivity are catathermal combustion devices, heat exchangers, and radiant burners.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Aircraft Engines
Ceramics
Composites
Launch and Flight Vehicle


Form Generated on 09-18-07 17:50