NASA SBIR 2007 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 07-1 A1.11-9128
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Universal Enabling IVHM Technologies in Architecture, System Integration, Databases, and Verification and Validation
PROPOSAL TITLE: A Verification and Validation Tool for Diagnostic Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Barron Associates, Inc.
1410 Sachem Place, Ste 202
Charlottesville, VA 22901 - 2559
(434) 973-1215

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Alec J. Bateman
barron@bainet.com
1410 Sachem Place, Suite 202
Charlottesville, VA 22901 - 2559
(434) 973-1215

Expected Technology Readiness Level (TRL) upon completion of contract: 1 to 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Advanced diagnostic systems have the potential to improve safety, increase availability, and reduce maintenance costs in aerospace vehicle and a variety of other mechanical system. Numerous recent research efforts have produced a variety of diagnostic algorithms that show significant promise, but to date advanced diagnostic approaches have seen rather limited use in operational air vehicle systems. One of the major hurdles to transitioning such systems to fleet vehicles is the lack of adequate verification and validation (V&V) approaches. Barron Associates and MUSYN propose a Phase I research effort to develop a V&V framework for diagnostic systems that combines novel analysis approaches with experimental techniques to provide high confidence in the performance of diagnostic techniques. Performance evaluation of diagnostic systems is currently based primarily on numerical testing approaches, which may be applied to both simulation results and actual experimental data. While such testing is extremely important and should form a key component of the overall V&V strategy, it is not adequate alone. This is because it is impossible to collect sufficient test data or even sufficient Monte Carlo simulation data to exhaustively cover the space of potential test conditions. To achieve reasonable confidence in the coverage of the V&V procedures, it is necessary to intelligently select Monte Carlo or experimental test points to target the regions of the test space that are most likely to reveal problems. The team will work to develop analysis approaches that can help to identify combinations of conditions (flight conditions, uncertainties, external disturbances, vehicle configuration, etc.) that are most likely to lead to inadequate performance of diagnostic algorithms. The team will also extend the existing CAESAR software tool for control law V&V to automate V&V of diagnostic systems.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The proposed V&V approaches will be applicable to diagnostic algorithms applied to a wide variety of systems developed and operated by NASA. Many future air vehicles can be expected to employ diagnostic algorithms to monitor systems including actuators, sensors, engines, gearboxes, and structural components. Examples of such vehicles include commercial transports, unmanned observation and communications platforms, and research aircraft. Diagnostic algorithms will be particularly important in commercial transport aircraft, where safety is of the utmost importance, and in long endurance unmanned vehicles, which lack human operators to recognize and respond to failure conditions. In the unforgiving environment of space travel, diagnostic algorithms will also offer significant benefits. Even in orbital flight, providing assistance to a damaged vehicle is extremely difficult and the problem will only be compounded on journeys to the moon and mars. Diagnostic algorithms will be critical to timely identification and isolation of fault conditions so the appropriate corrective actions can be initiated promptly.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The proposed V&V approaches will be applicable to diagnostic algorithms applied to a wide variety of systems developed and operated by NASA. Many future air vehicles can be expected to employ diagnostic algorithms to monitor systems including actuators, sensors, engines, gearboxes, and structural components. Examples of such vehicles include commercial transports, unmanned observation and communications platforms, and research aircraft. Diagnostic algorithms will be particularly important in commercial transport aircraft, where safety is of the utmost importance, and in long endurance unmanned vehicles, which lack human operators to recognize and respond to failure conditions. In the unforgiving environment of space travel, diagnostic algorithms will also offer significant benefits. Even in orbital flight, providing assistance to a damaged vehicle is extremely difficult and the problem will only be compounded on journeys to the moon and mars. Diagnostic algorithms will be critical to timely identification and isolation of fault conditions so the appropriate corrective actions can be initiated promptly.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
On-Board Computing and Data Management


Form Generated on 09-18-07 17:50