NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05-II X11.01-9875
PHASE-I CONTRACT NUMBER: NNJ06JD48C
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Radiation Health
PROPOSAL TITLE:Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Space Hardware Optimization Technology
7200 Highway 150
Greenville, IN 47124-9515
(812) 923-9591

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Leo A Shulthise
tshulthise@SHOT.com
7200 Highway 150
Greenville, IN  47124-9515
(812) 923-9591

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and other irradiation venues is proposed by SHOT, Inc. Full and efficient utilization of NSRL requires the automation of precise sample positioning and sample exchange that is otherwise performed manually at the cost of hours of beam time, compromised biostatistics and risk of personnel. The device and system will consist of eight sample holders providing an environmentally controlled enclosure. Samples to be irradiated will be translated into the ion beam, one at a time, within the controlled environment. Samples to be accommodated include, but are not limited to, cell cultures (multiple containers), small animal (flies, worms, fish) cultures, mice, rats and small samples of shielding or electronic materials. Operating software will be compatible with that in use at the irradiation venues, specifically NSRL, and will be used to establish environmental control settings, to record environmental conditions, and to control and record the insertion of samples into the ion beam. Stray doses to samples in waiting will be less than 0.001 of the dose delivered to exposed samples, and measures are included to minimize neutron flux within the sample chamber assembly. Total and neutron doses will be measured. Three objectives will be met in Phase II research: (1) implementation of user requirements (determined in Phase I) in a final design to be subjected to Critical Design Review (2) construction and testing of a complete sample management system at SHOT, and (3) installing the final prototype product at NSRL and placing it into use for the benefit of the user community.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Potential NASA applications are well-defined in the call for "Ground Based Heavy Ion Accelerator Research Support Equipment". Space radiation health research requires the study of model organisms and cells exposed to high-energy, highly charged (HZE) particle irradiation. The model radiation beams are available at a small number of venues internationally and specifically at NSRL at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For the efficient exposure of these specimens, including laboratory rodents, the proposed robotic environmentally controlled sample holders and changers are needed to minimize the exposure of personnel to background radiations in the cave and minimize beam time required per experiment. Improved efficiency and biological statistics will lead to improved reductions of uncertainty in space radiation health.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Potential non-NASA applications include three avenues of commercialization that SHOT intends to implement: (1) About a dozen facilities are in use or planned at which space radiation health research and/or particle radiotherapy research requires the study of model organisms and cells exposed to protons or HZE particle irradiation. SHOT intends to use its sales force to address this need by marketing the proposed innovation in the international particle radiobiology community. (2) Radiation oncology research groups that use large, expensive hospital radiotherapy equipment constitute a secondary market that may be larger than the primary market. As in the case of NASA applications, the proposed robotic environmentally controlled sample holders and changers are needed to minimize the exposure of personnel to background radiations and minimize beam time required per experiment. (3) The robotic technology developed for cell culture management will be translated into terrestrial laboratories through strategic corporate partnerships, one of which is currently being negotiated by SHOT.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Biomedical and Life Support


Form Printed on 07-25-06 17:04