NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05-II S4.03-8320
PHASE-I CONTRACT NUMBER: NNM06AA34C
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Cryogenic Systems for Sensors and Detectors
PROPOSAL TITLE:Vibration- Free Cooling Cycle Pump for Space Vehicles and Habitats

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Mainstream Engineering Corporation
200 Yellow Pl
Rockledge, FL 32955-5327
(321) 631-3550

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Daniel K Mason
dkm@mainstream-engr.com
200 Yellow Place
Rockledge, FL  32955-5327
(321) 631-3550

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
Mainstream Engineering Corporation completed the design of a high-speed pump for International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems and future spacecraft and extraterrestrial outpost applications. Specifications for this pump were derived from an existing pump currently operating as part of the thermal control loop on the ISS. The design includes magnetic bearings so that a vibration-reducing control algorithm can be implemented. A digital controller was designed, which measured and reduced vibration-causing fluctuations in shaft displacement due to rotor unbalance in multiple axes. The controller was tested over an operating speed range of 600 to 7200 rpm with excellent results. The controller reduced mean shaft displacement by 71% over the entire operating range, and reduced it by more than 80% at higher operating speeds where synchronous vibration was dominant. In Phase II the magnetic bearing equipped cooling loop pump designed in Phase I will be fabricated and tested. Mainstream will demonstrate the added efficiency, reliability, and low vibration of the system as compared with the existing pump. The pump assembly will undergo vibration characterization testing with support from Marshall Space Flight Center.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
High-speed magnetic bearing turbomachines have great potential to address the needs of NASA's thermal control applications. The particular system designed is an ideal retrofit for the PPA on the International Space Station. It should not only generate less vibration than the current system, but also have higher reliability and greater efficiency. A pump system that is vibration- and maintenance-free is ideal for the upcoming Crew Exploration Vehicle, Crew Launch Vehicle, and landing vehicles. Use in the thermal control systems of Martian and lunar outposts is also an excellent application. Applications utilizing this technology, including cooling systems based on reverse-Brayton and vapor-compression cycles, are perfectly suited for use on long-term detector and exploration missions.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Magnetic bearing systems have the ability to operate over an enormous speed range and can be designed and tuned to operate under most any loading conditions. The potential for this technology is great in other areas where high-sensitivity and reliability of rotating components are critical, including military surveillance and medical, HVAC, semiconductor fabrication, and machine tool industries.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Control Instrumentation
Cooling


Form Printed on 07-25-06 17:04