NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 X7.02-9038
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Chemical Propulsion Components
PROPOSAL TITLE:Physics-Based Pneumatic Hammer Instability Model

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
FLORIDA TURBINE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
140 Intracoastal Pointe, Suite 301
Jupiter ,FL 33477 - 5094
(561) 746 - 3317

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Philip    Pelfrey
ppelfrey@fttinc.com
140 Intracoastal Pointe, Suite 301
Jupiter, FL  33477 -5094
(561) 746 - 3317

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT) proposes to conduct research necessary to develop a physics-based pneumatic hammer instability model for hydrostatic bearings operating in a compressible fluid. The innovation of the resulting model is to account for the extreme density, compressibility, and non-uniform pressure variations found in highly turbulent rocket engine liquid hydrogen turbopump hydrostatic bearings as well as the variations resulting from 3-D effects such as tangential and/or axial injection, which are ignored in the pneumatic hammer instability criteria currently used throughout industry. The ability to accurately predict the stability of highly turbulent, highly compressible liquid hydrogen hydrostatic bearings incorporating 3-D effects is essential for NASA to achieve IHPRPT objectives through the use of smaller, faster turbopumps. This project will enable the accurate prediction of bearing stability, resulting in higher performing bearings that enable smaller operating clearances for improved turbopump and system-level performance.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Pneumatic hammer instability due to the compressibility of cryogenic liquid hydrogen is a major concern for NASA rocket engine fuel turbopumps. Current turbopumps, such as the IPD, and future turbopumps are sacrificing performance based on 35 year-old "rule-of-thumb" stability criteria. A validated, physics-based pneumatic hammer instability model will enable higher performing turbopumps, which result in greater system level performance.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
FTT is using the synergy from multiple programs to create a comprehensive advancement in technology for the benefit of many programs. Leveraging existing and planned bearing technology programs, development will include not only hydrostatic bearings applicable to rocket engine turbopumps, but also rolling element bearings and air bearings applicable to ARMY NLOS/UAV's. In support of this, FTT is developing small expendable turbine engine product lines for commercial applications in the 30 to 300 lbf thrust class.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Chemical
Feed System Components
Fundamental Propulsion Physics


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12