NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 X6.03-9788
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Launch Site Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE:Autonomous, Cryogenic Leak Detector for Improving Launch Site Operations

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
INNOSENSE LLC
2531 West 237th Street, Suite 127
Torrance ,CA 90505 - 5245
(310) 530 - 2011

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Kisholoy   Goswami
kisholoy.goswami@innosense.us
2531 West 237th Street, Suite 127
Torrance, CA  90505 -5245
(310) 530 - 2011

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
For detecting leakage of cryogenic fluids in spaceport facilities and in spacebound vehicles, this project proposes to demonstrate the feasibility of an all-optical sensor that can be fitted into narrow orifices around plumbing junctions. Fast response time and complete reversibility in the detection range of 1 ppm to 100% for hydrogen will be demonstrated in Phase I. This technology will support NASA goal of reducing vehicle and payload cost, and increase safety of ground and flight operations by measuring hydrogen in real-time and in situ. The sensor's thermal shock resistance when exposed to cryogenic fluids will also be tested in Phase I. A prototype device will be engineered, field-tested and delivered to NASA in Phase II. Successful discussions have been conducted with industrial partners for commercialization support including Phase III follow-on funding for this project. One major U.S. aerospace company has expressed strong interest in the proposed technology by providing a letter of support. A technical team having 70 years of cumulative experience in developing commercially viable products has been assembled for this project.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
NASA and its contractors such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, and other companies in the international arena will benefit from this project. Currently, NASA is relying on mass spectrometers. The all-optical sensor system is designed to decrease pay load while monitoring multiple leak locations in situ and in real time.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The present $1.2 billion worldwide gas sensing market needs small sensors to measure leaks in valves, as well as reliable personal units for general hydrogen gas safety monitoring. The transition from fossil fuel into a hydrogen economy could push the $120,000,000 annual hydrogen sensor market today into annual sales as high as $1,800, 000,000 by 2010 for hydrogen safety sensing according to current available estimates. Hydrogen feed stock sensors, needed to manage gas flow and purity, will further increase the demand for hydrogen sensors.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Autonomous Control and Monitoring
Data Acquisition and End-to-End-Management
Data Input/Output Devices
Earth-Supplied Resource Utilization
Fluid Storage and Handling
In-situ Resource Utilization
Instrumentation
Launch and Flight Vehicle
Microgravity
On-Board Computing and Data Management
Optical
Optical & Photonic Materials
Photonics
Propellant Storage


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12