NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 X11.01-7517
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Radiation Health
PROPOSAL TITLE:Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Ultramet
12173 Montague St
Pacoima ,CA 91331 - 2210
(818) 899 - 0236

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Jason R. Babcock
jason.babcock@ultramet.com
Ultramet
Pacoima, CA  91331 -2210
(818) 899 - 0236

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are needed for large structures such as the space station, orbiters, landers, rovers, habitats, and spacesuits. Materials currently used are heavy, bulky, and ineffective in shielding humans against cosmic radiation, especially over long periods (months or years). One means of solving the problem of heavy radiation shields is to use lightweight polymeric shields that do not produce dangerous secondary radiation when irradiated, but these are typically not mechanically sound in structural applications. Ultramet has developed a versatile method for producing metal and ceramic foams that would function well as reinforcement phases in polymeric shields. This material is amenable to complexly shaped and large components and has been demonstrated under other programs to provide good particle trap capacity and exhibit no damage under extreme variations of temperature, high porosity, and low density. Ultramet proposes to fabricate high-efficiency polymer matrix composite radiation shields that will withstand repeated exposure to cosmic radiation. Initial shielding performance will be demonstrated through simulated cosmic radiation testing at Eril Research, and the program will benefit from collaboration with Northrop Grumman, a potential end user of the technology.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Radiation shielding for astronauts and the communications electronics, sensitive instruments, and life-support systems upon which they rely is the primary application. High strength-to-weight, impact-resistant materials are important for many other NASA applications, including spacecraft structures and support struts, acreage airframe skins, and other complexly shaped components.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The composite materials to be developed combine innovative foam materials, rapid infiltration of polymeric matrices, and the potential for the production of complexly shaped and/or thick-section polymer matrix composites. In addition to the NASA applications, which are also of commercial interest in spacecraft such as communications satellites and future human space travel, higher temperature capable polymers used as the matrix in the composite have been evaluated as replacements for metal components in the cooler sections of turbine engines. These materials could also supplant some of the composite components that comprise more than 25% of the structural weight of such advanced aircraft as the Joint Strike Fighter, F-22 Raptor, and Airbus A380. These components can also be used in recuperators, ducts and other hot gas path components, process industry parts requiring high temperature capability and corrosive environment resistance (e.g. hot gas and liquid handling equipment) for extended periods, furnace structures, and high temperature filter elements.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Ceramics
Composites
Radiation Shielding Materials


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12