NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 X1.01-9182
SUBTOPIC TITLE:In-Space Computing and Reconfigurable Electronics
PROPOSAL TITLE:Modular, Fault-Tolerant Electronics Supporting Space Exploration

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
AeroAstro, Inc.
20145 Ashbrook Place
Ashburn ,VA 20147 - 3373
(703) 723 - 9800

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
William   Seng
bill.seng@aeroastro.com
20145 Ashbrook Place
Ashburn, VA  20147 -3373
(703) 723 - 9800

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
AeroAstro's innovative design approach for implementing reconfigurable electronics frees the spacecraft designer to concentrate on the mission at hand with significant assurance that single-point failures can be automatically corrected. It also uses dynamic reconfiguration to change circuit functions which will create the opportunity to conserve mass, volume, and power while providing capabilities that may have been valuable, but deemed to be less important or infrequently needed so that they could not justify dedicated hardware. The system operates at a much finer level of granularity than with other reconfigurable approaches, which increases not the only adaptability and versatility, but also reduces the redundancy required to assure the success of the mission. Unlike traditional approaches that employ redundant systems, there are no mass penalties, and affordability is achievable. Significant benefits include dramatic orders of magnitude reduction in mass, volume, and cost.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Reconfigurability benefits all missions by providing graceful degradation of electronic systems after damage, and also enabling additional functionality.
The improved safety achieved is essential to success. Failures result in loss of experiments, the mission, and even the astronauts' lives. Delays in restoring failed equipment to at least minimal functionality are intolerable. The demands of interplanetary travel are more difficult, beginning with Mars exploration missions, much longer in duration, thus increasing the likelihood of failure. There will be powerful contention over the allocation of resources. Compromises reducing spare parts are inevitable. Self-diagnosing, self-repairing systems enhance the success of these bold ventures.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Military systems, to destroy sensitive equipment if capture is imminent, to cloak equipment by stealth or to enable graceful degradation after battle damage. Electronic systems not used simultaneously can be combined into a single reconfigurable system.

The aircraft industry. Critical system failure might cost hundreds of souls. Other transportation systems, including automotive, trucks, railroads, and ships.

Power plants, electrical transmission/distribution systems, financial networks, homeland security-related systems.

Medical systems, vital in operating rooms and other areas of hospitals, and personal electronic systems that sustain life benefit from increased reliability.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Architectures and Networks
Attitude Determination and Control
Autonomous Control and Monitoring
Computer System Architectures
Data Acquisition and End-to-End-Management
Data Input/Output Devices
Guidance, Navigation, and Control
Highly-Reconfigurable
Manned-Manuvering Units
On-Board Computing and Data Management
Pilot Support Systems
Portable Life Support
Power Management and Distribution
RF
Radiation-Hard/Resistant Electronics
Suits
Telemetry, Tracking and Control
Tools
Ultra-High Density/Low Power


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12