NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 S6.07-9346
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Thermal Control for Instruments
PROPOSAL TITLE:High Efficiency, Easy-to-Manufacture Engineered Nanomaterials for Thermoelectric Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Voxtel, Inc
12725 SW Millikan Way, Suite 230
Beaverton ,OR 97005 - 1687
(971) 223 - 5646

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Andrew   Huntington
andrew@voxtel-inc.com
12725 SW Millikan Way, Ste. 230
Beaverton, OR  97005 -1687
(971) 223 - 5646

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
In this Phase I SBIR program, high thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) thermoelectric (TE) materials will be developed that have thermal efficiency properties far better than traditional bulk thermoelectric materials. The proposed TE materials improve performance by increasing electrical conductivity while reducing thermal conductivity. In the proposed work, TE devices will be fabricated from solidified quantum dot films that are formed from colloidally synthesized NQDs using consolidation and second phase precipitation. The overall goal of the program is to develop an advanced thermoelectric nanomaterial that will offer significant cost, flexibility, and performance benefits for NASA applications.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are used to provide electrical power in space applications where their long life and independence from available solar energy outweigh their relatively high cost and reliance upon radioisotopes. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) can be used to chill spaceborne infrared detectors, and regulate the temperature of computers and other electronic gear. The sensitivity, reliability, linearity, and stability of electrical and optical components is critical to NASA missions and is reliant on proper thermal management. Nevertheless, the widespread use of TE components is presently limited by their inefficiency and cost. New thermoelectric materials will make a dramatic difference for the next generation of instruments for planned NASA missions, and with increased efficiencies will permit reduced power budgets. Thus, this research is highly significant to NASA.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Cheaper, more efficient TE materials would enable a variety of demanding cooling and power generation applications of relevance to everything from automotive engineering to consumer electronics. Thermoelectric generators could eventually be used to scavange waste heat, such as that produced by combustion in an automobile, and provide supplemental electricity. TECs are of particular interest to chip manufacturers, who face challenges in disposing of waste heat from increasingly miniaturized integrated circuits. Ultimately, TECs could provide maintenance-free refrigeration in a variety of consumer markets such as food storage and air conditioning that are presently served by mechanical compressors that rely upon moving parts, valves, and air-tight seals.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Cooling
Semi-Conductors/Solid State Device Materials
Thermoelectric Conversion


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12