NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 S6.07-7787
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Thermal Control for Instruments
PROPOSAL TITLE:High Efficiency Microchannel Diamond Heat Sinks

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
DIAMOND MATERIALS INC.
120 Centennial Ave.
Piscataway ,NJ 08854 - 3908
(732) 885 - 0805

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Anthony   Ribaudo
anthonyribaudo@aol.com
120 Centennial Ave.
Piscataway, NJ  08854 -3908
(732) 885 - 2929

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
While absolute power levels in microelectronic devices are relatively modest (a few tens to a few hundred watts), heat fluxes can be significant (~50 W/cm2 in current electronic chips; up to 2000 W/cm2 in semiconductor lasers). Microchannel diamond heat sinks created via microfabrication techniques make it possible to boost heat transfer rates well above what is possible with ordinary cooling devices. If nanodiamond particles are added in suspension to the circulating fluid in the microchannels, the heat carrying properties of the device would be increased even more. The devices we are proposing to fabricate would utilize diamond which has the highest thermal conductivity of any known material combined with a microchannel cooling system. These unique attributes would make microchannel diamond heat sinks prime contenders for the next generation heat sink. These devices could be utilized for efficient cooling in a variety of applications requiring high heat transfer capability including: semiconductor lasers, multichip modules in computers laser-diode arrays, radar systems, high-flux optics, etc. An added benefit for outer space applications is that besides having the highest known thermal conductivity, diamond is the best shielding material for micrometeorite protection.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Diamond Microchannel heat sink would have a wide variety of applications where high heat transfer capability is required such as: semiconducting lasers, multichip modules in computers laser-diode arrays, radar systems, high-flux optics, etc. This type of device can be used in all NASA applications where enhanced heat transfer is a requirement, and could be especially useful when combined with micro-meteorite protection since diamond is the best shielding material as well as thermal conductor.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Potential non-NASA applications could be much broader. Diamond can be used as a highly conducting substrate for powerful micro-chips, since diamond has the greatest thermal conductivity of all known materials at room temperature and higher. Hence, microchannel diamond heat exchangers would be ideal for providing efficient cooling of high-frequency electronic devices as well as highly integrated computer chips.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Cooling


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12