NASA SBIR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 A2.06-8239
SUBTOPIC TITLE:Smart, Adaptive Aerospace Vehicles With Intelligence
PROPOSAL TITLE:Vibration Energy Harvesting for SHM Sensors

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
TPL Inc
3921 Academy Parkway North, NE
Albuquerque ,NM 87109 - 4416
(505) 344 - 6744

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Charles   Lakeman
clakeman@tplinc.com
3921 Academy Parkway North NE
Albuquerque, NM  87109 -4416
(505) 342 - 4427

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Wireless sensors show enormous promise for safety improvements and cost reductions in monitoring the structural health of aircraft and spacecraft. A significant challenge for wireless sensors is power. Because of the labor and associated costs associated with changing hundreds, if not thousands of batteries, combined with the fact that many will be deployed in inaccessible locations, these systems will have to rely on harvesting energy from the environment to provide long-lived power.

TPL and Washington State University (WSU) propose to develop a vibrational energy harvesting system based on the P3 (Palouse Piezo Power) Micropower Generator. The P3 is a patented, MEMS-based, piezoelectric membrane generator that has been demonstrated to operate over 1 billion cycles. In this effort, TPL will team with WSU researchers to develop a microfabricated proof mass for coupling vibrational energy into the piezoelectric membrane and to develop packaging for the device so it can be deployed in real world situations.

Combined with TPL's patented microbatteries and microsupercapacitors for energy storage, the proposed system will provide a stand-alone power source that does not need recharging or refueling for wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) systems.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed technology will provide a stand-alone power source for wireless sensors that does not need recharging or refueling. There are numerous applications for wireless sensors in aerospace, defense, medical, environmental, and industrial sectors ranging from structural health monitoring, industrial process control, environmental (HVAC) management, infrastructure security, and battlefield chemical and biological weapons detection, among others. NASA's interest in structural health monitoring, in particular, extends to air and space vehicles, fixed wing and rotorcraft, satellites, inter-planetary mission vehicles, and high altitude, long endurance (HALE) vehicles. For wireless sensors in general, NASA applications will extend from remote sensing on earth, climate and meteorological monitoring, and geolocation in planetary exploration.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
There is a myriad of non-NASA applications for structural health monitoring, including bridges, buildings (particularly high value, or sensitive buildings such as nuclear power or chemical plants), seismic detection, and ships (e.g. oil tankers or other vessels carrying cargoes that may be harmful if spilled). Other applications of wireless sensors extend into medical, industrial manufacturing (inventory management, process control), agricultural, domestic (smart house), and automotive (some estimate up to 1trillion automotive sensors in 2010 including tire pressure monitors and stability control).

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Power Management and Distribution
Sensor Webs/Distributed Sensors


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:12