NASA SBIR 2004 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 04 X2.04-7847
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Cryogenic Propellant Depots
PROPOSAL TITLE: To Ensure the Integrity of the Cryogenic Propellant Depot Tank within the Expected Radiation and Space Debris Environment

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
HYPERCOMP ENGINEERING, INC.
1080 North Main Suite #2
Brigham City, UT 84302-0505
(435)734-1166

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
James Patterson
jamesp@hypercompeng.com
1080 North Main Suite #2
Brigham City, UT 84302-0505
(435)734-1166

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
We intend to develop the technology for lightweight composite structure suitable for both cryogenic fuel depot storage as well as human in-space habitat. These will incorporate improved impact technologies for micro-meteor/space debris protection and radiation capable composite technologies.

The application of filament wound composite pressure vessels to uses requiring pressurized storage at cryogenic temperatures has been undertaken at HyPerComp Engineering with promising results. Progress has been made in expanding the knowledge of how filament winding fibers and matrix systems (resins) react to loads and strain at extremely cold temperatures, such as would be encountered in in-space fuel storage depots. As with the cryogenic composite pressure vessel research, HyPerComp Engineering has been conducting research and has patented, jointly with NASA, a robust impact resistant composite pressure vessel technology. This technology shows great promise in its resistance to performance degradation from impacts, such as might be experienced in the space environment in the form of micrometeoroids and space debris. This "robust" technology has also demonstrated "non-catastrophic failure-mode" capabilities which could potentially reduce mission losses and tankage losses due to both space debris and other incidental impacts.

We intend to develop a baseline composite material capable of both cryogenic and radiation applications.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 100 WORDS)
Potential NASA applications for the technologies we propose researching and developing would be light weight composite structures that could be used for reliable and safe cryogenic propellant (i.e. fuel depots) storage, radiation resistant/shielding human habitat structures, and robust structures and tankage capable of withstanding micrometeroid and space debris impacts.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 100 WORDS)
Potential commercial applications of the proposed technology would include the commercial satellite industry where they may have hardware in space (i.e. Low Earth Orbit) that is subject to impact and radiation space environmental hazards as well as requiring cryogenic fuel storage for their platforms.